Alpha Centauri 2

Community => Recreation Commons => Topic started by: Elok on July 10, 2015, 02:54:54 PM

Title: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Elok on July 10, 2015, 02:54:54 PM
I am, at this point, the only grown man in my immediate family who isn't an expert cook.  It's a bit late in life for me to try to catch up, and besides, I'm too lazy to do all that junk my brother copies off the Food Network.  At present, I'm living in a house with three electric coil burners on the stove (the fourth was burned out by my FIL years ago), an oven that doesn't cook at the temperature you set it to, and a really awesome pressure cooker my wife got off the internet.  Also, no dishwasher.  Still very happy here, but I've got a limited repertoire.

What are your favorite lazy-but-good recipes?  I like pasta al'amatriciana, or rather a bastardized version thereof.  I got it off a Cooks Illustrated cookbook.  The real version hails from a suburb of Rome and involves pancetta, pecorino cheese, and an exotic hollow-tube pasta called bucatini.  This'n is bacon, parmesan and whatever noodle I've got handy.  It's real simple: cut up the bacon in bits and fry it, take out the bacon and fry onions in the grease, add diced tomato (canned will do) and cook until significant juice releases.  Add a modest amount of hot pepper.  Then mix it all, including the bacon, with your pasta and little parmesan cubes.  The end result is a mix of tart, sweet, smoky, salty and spicy flavors, beautifully balanced.

What do you cook when you're feeling lazy?
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Metaliturtle on July 10, 2015, 03:03:03 PM
In college we made a sandwich called the Belly Bustin' Bacon Sammich.

We'd get the cheapo end cuts of bacon (cheapest bacon per pound by a large order of magnitude).

Fry the bacon up the way you like it. Remove from pan to serving plate.

2 pieces of bread, toss them in the hot pan.  You can butter the grill-side first if you want a more golden color. 

Add Shredded cheese to one piece of bread.

Add bacon from serving plate to the top of the cheese.

Make a sammich.

Put said sammich back onto the serving plate in the grease.

Eat.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on July 10, 2015, 04:05:33 PM
Let me wake up, and I got a few.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Geo on July 10, 2015, 04:26:24 PM
BUNCLE!!! Don't doze off again!! :P
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on July 10, 2015, 04:34:21 PM
My brain.  Slow booting like my machine every morning...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Lorizael on July 10, 2015, 04:51:11 PM
If I'm feeling lazy, I eat Cheetos. If I'm feeling adventurous, I "cook" Pasta-Roni.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on July 10, 2015, 04:57:14 PM
My specialty dishes are all meat-in-the-oven, and hard to talk about since I don't use recipes and much varies according to the size and leanness of the cut.  Still waking up...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Elok on July 10, 2015, 05:57:23 PM
Lori, you might profit from the southern concept of "greens."  That's what it's called when you take any leafy vegetable and cook it in enough salt and animal fat to seemingly render the nutritional content of said vegetable moot.  But it still counts.  The very lazy version would be cooking frozen spinach in butter.  Tastes okay, introduces vitamins into your diet.  And it's really hard to get easier than that.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on July 10, 2015, 06:01:36 PM
Throw in a slice of bacon for better flavor on dishes like that. ;nod
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Geo on July 10, 2015, 06:49:34 PM
Everything goes with bacon with you. ;lol
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on July 10, 2015, 07:05:42 PM
Well, this is an embarrassing truth, sir.

I just found out I'm grilling BBQ ribs for supper, too.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Geo on July 10, 2015, 07:54:59 PM
 ;lol
Something I missed during my stay: porch BBQ. ;)
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on July 10, 2015, 08:05:57 PM
You have to come back in warm weather; after you charmed everyone, you'd certainly be welcome.

(Folks, my pal, Mr. G.Modder, is a lovely person in analogue, though I'll lie if you try to repeat that I said so.)
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on July 10, 2015, 09:48:47 PM
Time to go BBQ - maybe I'll post my non-recipe for my Barbeque sauce, which Mylochka finds to be, quote, "Epic".

Back in an hour or two...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on July 10, 2015, 11:33:51 PM
I'm kind of out of sync here.

Lazy usually involves  a pizza oven, microwave, or soup can. Or sandwiches.

For a pasta dish like that- I prefer Rotini. Those corkscrews are good at holding sauce and bits of chopped stuff like bacon.

Title: NORTH CAROLINA barbeque sauce semi-recipe
Post by: Buster's Uncle on July 11, 2015, 12:05:15 AM
Okay, here's what I have for a BBQ sauce 'recipe' that I worked out for myself one day when we only had about a third as much of the grocery store stuff as we needed, and I had to improvise.  All amounts are not really amounts, but very vague proportions - I improvise a lot in my cooking, and if you don't know what you like, I can't really help you.  Also, meal to meal amounts needed vary according to whatever, including your druthers:

-1/3 cup some Kraft BBQ sauce - whatever you like w/o spending a lot of money.
-1/3 cup Ketchup (I know - trust me, willya?)
-1/3 cup A-1 Steak Sauce (Makes weird BBQ sauce by itself, but generally delicious stuff.  The most key single ingredient.)
-Slop in some Liquid Smoke flavor.  Slop in some Worcestershire Sauce.  (Do those two to taste, but they are not easily overdone.)
-A few drops of Texas Pete/tobasco sauce. (This one is highly dependent on the tastes of who's going to be eating.  A little goes a long way for some of us, but still really adds BBQ personality in the amount right for you.)
-A very light sprinkling of Garlic.  (Garlic can easily overwhelm any dish, so super-YMMV, according to tastes, like the hot sauce.)
-Slop on Sage.  (I have never managed to overdo sage on any meat dish I use it on - the flavor is subtle, but delicious - and sage is also a legal euphoric, BTW.)
-Light sprinkling of Basil.  (I don't taste the difference, but basil makes dishes that smell a little funny, like boiling chicken, smell good.  My mother says too much basil tastes bitter, so careful with it.)

Barbeque tastes better if the meat and the sauce are cooked together, at least a little at the end.  I painted a minimal amount on the ribs I was grilling when they were nearly done, because I didn't want to waste a bunch dripping into the grill, and I didn't want the sugar in the sauce burning much.  When we took the meat in to eat, I put the measuring cup, maybe 3/4 a cup of sauce left, in the microwave for one minute to cook - then we applied to the ribs on our platea and ate.

Mylochka did, indeed, say, quote, "Epic" without any prompting but the flavor in her mouth.  She may be passed out from "the itis" by the time I post this post.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on July 11, 2015, 01:02:34 AM
(We had maybe a quarter cup of the sauce left over, so Momma applied it to a pan of chicken to marinate overnight in the fridge for grilled BBQ chicken tomorrow, when I'll have to mix another cup of sauce for good measure.  Epicness anticipated.)
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on July 11, 2015, 05:12:38 AM
Uno's Fajitas:

Dice up ye chicken
Slice up ye bell peppers and onions
add celery salt, olive oil (so it don't stick to pan) and cholula (Or hot sauce of your choosing, prefer cholula for this.  Omit the olive oil if using the grilling basket on the grill)

Optional garnish:  Sliced tomatoes, cover with basil, salt, garlic and onion.  Sautee in olive oil. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on July 11, 2015, 05:13:20 AM
Do you have a crock pot? 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on July 11, 2015, 05:16:47 AM
! No longer available (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k-BnBQX63Mo#)

The sticky rum gets my :b: for lazy good food.  Pour on chicken, broil till done, TADA! 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on July 11, 2015, 05:20:42 AM
http://www.advancepierre.com/Brands/Steak-EZE.aspx (http://www.advancepierre.com/Brands/Steak-EZE.aspx)

Steak sammiches made easy.  Bell peppers, onions, dash of worchestershire (spelling) and soy, optional hot sauce. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on July 11, 2015, 05:37:37 AM
Uno's crock pot lasagna:

****I'm cooking for a family of 5 with 2 teens and make enough to take for lunch a few days on top of that*****

2lbs HOT sausage browned
2 cans Tomato Sauce
large cottage cheese
2 cans diced tomatoes
8 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
2 large onions, diced
Basil and thyme to taste.

Throw that all in the crock pot and turn it on.  Go about your day.  FORGET ABOUT IT.  (minimum 1 hour on high, 2 on low, can wait infinitely long on low)

Stir in noodles 30 minutes before you want to eat.  We use a whole package of the shells, but virtually any noodle will work.  It'll look like I'm nuts when you add them, but the Noodles soak up enough to eat this with a fork

Top with mozzerella or whatever you wish when you eat. 

This 30 minutes to cook noodles in a crock will work for spaghetti, Meat and Macaroni, pretty much any pasta dish.  FYI. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Valka on July 11, 2015, 11:13:35 AM
My laziest recipes:

1. Open can. Put fork/spoon into can. Scoop out food. Eat.

2. Find website of preferred pizza place. Complete online order form. Find debit card. Wait for pizza to arrive. Eat.


Honestly, I'm not much of a cook, and I hate doing dishes. I can do it if I have to, but since it's just the cats and myself, there's really not any point to making a fuss.


I've got a couple of chocolate-themed dessert recipes, though (originals), but they can be a bit time-consuming.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Geo on July 11, 2015, 01:17:44 PM
(We had maybe a quarter cup of the sauce left over, so Momma applied it to a pan of chicken to marinate overnight in the fridge for grilled BBQ chicken tomorrow, when I'll have to mix another cup of sauce for good measure.  Epicness anticipated.)

Do I smell a Kentucky comin'? ;cute
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on July 11, 2015, 03:04:42 PM
No - although I am pretty sure that sage is one of the 11 herds and spices.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on July 11, 2015, 05:04:06 PM
No - although I am pretty sure that sage is one of the 11 herds and spices.

Didn't you mean 11 herds and mices ?
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on July 11, 2015, 05:14:06 PM
No, but I like your way of putting it better...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on July 11, 2015, 06:06:59 PM
Update - Mylochka passed out on her couch for about four hours after supper.  The Itis, indeed.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on July 11, 2015, 08:21:34 PM
No, but I like your way of putting it better...

Because I figure that the house mice are the sagest of them all.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on July 11, 2015, 08:39:24 PM
As Jervis said in the first season of Survivor when they cooked rats, after expressing a lot of reservations but finally having a bite -they were very hungry by then-  "We GOTS to have us some mo' rat!"
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Valka on July 11, 2015, 09:00:53 PM
Back in the first season, it really was more of a survival situation. There was one reward challenge where the reward wasn't some exotic picnic - it was one slice of pizza. Just one slice. He (Jervis) won that, and instead of eating it all himself, he shared it with the rest of them - everyone got one bite, and they were very appreciative to get it.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on July 11, 2015, 09:12:12 PM
Jervis is pretty awesome - what was hilarious about the rat story was that he's not a "street" type - he'd been using his public 'white' voice, always, until one bite of rat leg.  Hunger has power...

I was always disappointed that that show was just a game show done cheap, instead of a soap opera done cheap.  Like pretty much all 'reality' shows -and I go back to the first four seasons of The Real World- it kept getting less interesting after the first season.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Valka on July 11, 2015, 09:31:22 PM
These reality game shows were much more realistic in their earlier seasons. The current season of Big Brother is on now, and there's a few of us on TrekBBS who watch and comment on the CBS shows.

I remember when BB had weekly food competitions, to see what the houseguests would get to eat for the week. It was interesting to see who would pick junk food or other tasty but less than healthy choices over a balanced diet.

Now they have weekly 'have-nots' who have to sleep in insanely uncomfortable ways and eat "slop" (no idea what's in that, but apparently it's completely tasteless and rather disgusting in texture).

Then there was the Amazing Race a few seasons back when one team complained about having to eat pickled herring... I love pickled herring! I wouldn't have had any problem with that task, as long as I had some antacid or plain soda crackers handy afterward (very acidic, pickled herring is, when you have to eat as much in one sitting as they did ;)).
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on July 11, 2015, 09:47:01 PM
The game 'reality' shows leave me incredibly cold.  I lasted a few seasons of Survivor because it wasn't THAT obvious what it was when it began, but even the Real World -which began as charismatic people interacting, which interests me- got faker and faker and set up to showcase the part I liked least -the fighting- with deliberately casting drunken, broken people and lots of artificial conditions designed to foment conflict.  NO thank you.

I haven't mentioned food this time.  [shrugs]  I can split the thread if anyone, especially Elok, wants, or we keep talking reality shows, something I'm not uninterested in doing, seriously...  (I like the celebrity ones, and not because I'm a People Magazine reader type, or necessarily like the celebrities shown.)
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on July 11, 2015, 10:24:05 PM
Perhaps this qualifies as lazy, because it's essentially meat and dessert in one dish-

Candy Fried Pork and Apples ( basically bites of pork chop mixed with apple dumpling contents.)

*1 pound of pork loin ( or 4 chops ) cut into 1/2 or 3/4 inch cubes.
*1 teaspoon of cooking oil
*3 or 4 baking apples ( Granny Smith, Northern Spy, Cortland, and Empire for examples), cored and sliced into 1/2 inch slices.
*1 bottle of cinnamon flavored hard cider.

*1/2 cup brown sugar
*3 Tablespoons of cornstarch.
*2 T of Worcestershire sauce
*1/2 teaspoon of salt
*1/4 t of ground black pepper
*1/4 t of ground cinnamon

Heat the oil in a large frying pan. Brown the pork on all sides. Add apples and sauté for 3 minutes, while stirring now and then. Add 1/2 cup of cider. Reduce heat, cover, and simmer for 10 minutes.

Mix another 3/4 cup of cider with the dry ingredients in a bowl. Drink the rest of the cider, or add it to the mix.

When the 10 minutes are up, add mix to frying pan and raise heat to medium. Stir constantly until sauce thickens, and serve, or reduce heat to minimum, until you can.

Obviously, the best pairing with this is hard cider.  What isn't obvious is that this is something you want to consume entirely while it's still hot, or at least warm, because it makes for slimy leftovers.

Maybe you object to the alcohol, or don't have any hard cider. You can substitute white wine, chicken broth, or non-alcoholic cider,   and use 1/4 cup of cider vinegar as part of the liquid in the mixing portion.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Elok on July 12, 2015, 07:32:47 PM
I'm cool with the conversation going wherever.

I used to do something fun with pork and apples myself, though I can't recall the details.  I know it involved cinnamon and brown sugar, so it was basically fried apples with pork thrown in instead of served alongside it.

I recommend that everybody who's serious about being lazy and/or impatient in the kitchen get a pressure cooker.  My wife got one called "Instant Pot" (it's Japanese or something and does not, to my knowledge, involve marijuana) off Amazon; it's a pressure cooker, slow cooker, and plain ol' ordinary cooker all in one.  You can set it to sautee and fry onions in this thing, and since it's heating from every direction but up it cooks onions, bacon and the like quite fast.

(why is there no lip-licking smiley here?)
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on July 12, 2015, 07:38:57 PM
Because no one's asked - but wait; Geo asked for something very close, and I aim to please...  ;relish

-That's relish, lower-case, with a semicolon (you don't have to shift to type a semi, so I use a lot for smilie codes for ease of typing in) in front w/o a space between, and I'd venture that this thread needs that smilie...


I wish to note that my semi-recipe is a NORTH CAROLINA barbeque sauce semi-recipe. ;nod  I better edit that post...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Lorizael on July 13, 2015, 02:10:00 AM
Maybe because lip-licking smileys are always inevitably creepy.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on July 13, 2015, 02:15:19 AM
 :mad: I'M invariably creepy - so what? :mad:
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on July 13, 2015, 01:46:10 PM
:mad: I'M invariably creepy :mad:

Hardly. 


I don't watch reality as a general rule, OTHER than Face Off.  It is pretty much a straight up talent competition (much more so than your singing BS shows) with very little to no 'drama' your typical reality show tries to play up.  It's judged by experts, no audience voting crap.  I'm disappointed Syfy didn't learn that's what makes that show great with their various spinoffs (one for SET design, and one for more muppet styled monsters) that amped up the personal drama at the expense of the talent show, and thus got swiftly cancelled.   

Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on July 13, 2015, 02:07:30 PM
Emphasizing the fighting at the expense of everything else is what wrong with reality shows, television and the world - don't they see what harm they do?

Leaving aside my personal repulsion, don't they see that?
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Metaliturtle on July 19, 2015, 11:10:21 PM
;relish ?
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on July 19, 2015, 11:16:15 PM
Time to change yer personal text for that...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Metaliturtle on July 19, 2015, 11:26:27 PM
Que?
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on July 19, 2015, 11:36:15 PM
Read yer personal text, soony-me-lad.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Metaliturtle on July 19, 2015, 11:37:18 PM
oh the +2?  But aren't posts still just +1?
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on July 19, 2015, 11:47:02 PM
It's complicated.

You'll understand when you're older.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Metaliturtle on July 19, 2015, 11:47:53 PM
Thanks for giving me colorful currency tag on my personal text, neither personal nor text on mine right now.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on July 19, 2015, 11:56:40 PM
On your WHAT?

Talk about food, spamo.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Metaliturtle on July 19, 2015, 11:58:07 PM
Fried spam sandwich, people say it's good.... NOPE!!!!
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on July 20, 2015, 12:29:08 AM
We've had our fun, Jimmy the Weasle - time for you to post a recipe.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Geo on July 20, 2015, 09:47:34 PM
Had a lazy gourmet evening: went to dinner at my parents' place. ;b;
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on July 20, 2015, 11:04:51 PM
That sounds lazy to me! ;b;
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on July 21, 2015, 02:09:30 AM
I grilled ribs again w/ my famous sauce...  Not bad. ;nod
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on July 25, 2015, 01:45:27 PM
...I should write up Pizza God pizza - but there really is no recipe; it's a philosophy, a Way...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Zoid on July 29, 2015, 08:49:29 PM
Lazy food: mostly pasta or grilled cheese sandwiches. I have a Panini grill, it's earning its keep here let me tell you :)

For pasta I vary between several recipes, from a very basic Spaghetti Aglio e olio to the slightly more elaborate Spaghetti Puttanesca, Carbonara is also known to show up from time to time...

SPAGHETTI AGLIO E OLIO
Salt and Pepper
1 1/2 pounds Spaghetti
1/2 cup Extra Virgin Olive Oil
3 Garlic cloves (sliced thinly)
1 tablespoon Red Chili Flakes
3/4 cup Pickled Cherry Peppers
1/2 cup Flat-Leaf Parsley

Bring a large pot of water to a boil over high heat and season generously with salt. Cook the pasta for one minute less than the package instructions.
Meanwhile, in a large saute pan over medium-low heat, add about 1/3 cup of olive oil. Add the garlic, chili flakes and pickled peppers. Add a tablespoon of pasta water to ensure the garlic doesn't brown. Cook gently until the garlic softens, about 8 minutes.
Remove the pasta from the water and transfer to the pan. Toss to coat and add a ladle full of reserved pasta water.
Drizzle with a healthy amount of olive oil and toss in the chopped parsley. Toss to coat and emulsify the sauce. Serve in bowls.

Jamie Olivers Spaghetti Puttanesca:
1 pound (455 grams) dried spaghetti, the best you can get
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
1 handful capers, soaked in water and drained
2 handfuls big black olives, pitted
12 anchovy fillets, roughly chopped
3 small dried red chiles, crumbled
1 tablespoon dried oregano
Extra-virgin olive oil
2 (14 ounce/400gram) cans tomatoes, drained and chopped
1 good handful fresh basil
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
 
Cook the spaghetti in salted, boiling water until al dente. Meanwhile fry the garlic, capers, olives, anchovies, chiles, and oregano in a little olive oil for a few minutes. Add the tomatoes, bring to a simmer, and continue to cook for 4 or 5 minutes, until you have a lovely tomato sauce consistency. Remove from the heat, plunge the drained spaghetti into it, toss it over, and cover with the sauce. Rip all the basil over it, correct the seasoning, and drizzle with good extra-virgin olive oil.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Elok on July 31, 2015, 06:34:20 PM
You know what's easy to make?  Spicy guacamole!
You know what has cheap ingredients?  Spicy guacamole!
You know what's good for you?  Spicy guacamole!
You know what's delicious?  Spicy guacamole!

So, what should you eat more of?

Provided you use hass avocados, I tried the Florida kind and the results were unimpressive . . .
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on July 31, 2015, 06:40:29 PM
What's your recipe, then?
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Elok on August 01, 2015, 03:24:58 AM
Borrowed one off the internet after a quick Google.  I tried it as a kid and hated it, decided to retry it after hearing about avocados' anti-inflammatory properties.  Avocado, bit of diced onion (less than a quarter of a red one), two cloves of garlic, juice of a half lemon and change, bit of cilantro, salt, pepper, and I didn't have jalapenos or serranos so I just squeezed on sriracha until it had the right amount of zap.  Worked out fine.  But Florida avocado makes it both look and taste pretty eh.

Tomorrow's the Dormition Fast, see you in two weeks.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on August 01, 2015, 03:29:47 AM
Again?
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on August 04, 2015, 01:19:45 AM
...Grilled ribs again, and this time I was able to keep on top of the charring... ;nod
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on August 05, 2015, 01:25:50 AM
Tonight-
Put frozen freedom fries in oven for 12 minutes @425 degrees.
Move fries to one end of tray. Add Chicken Nuggets and clam strips, bake for and additional 8 minutes.
Remove and serve. LAZY.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Dio on August 05, 2015, 01:30:23 AM
...Grilled ribs again, and this time I was able to keep on top of the charring... ;nod
Tonight it was baked boneless skinless chicken breasts coated with dry bread crumbs, olive oil, basil leaves, grated parmesan cheese, and garlic  :).
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on August 05, 2015, 01:39:20 AM
Momma cooked country style hamburger for supper.  -You know country styled steak in gravy?  This is the cheap-and-easy version, and surprisingly good.

My invention, and you already know the recipe, now.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on August 05, 2015, 01:40:39 AM
While I'm not personally a  chicken enthusiast - that does sound rather easy and tasty.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on August 05, 2015, 01:56:51 AM
Yep.  No tenderizing a perfectly good cut of meat into hamburger, no paying for a perfectly good cut of meat.  A sizable portion of the taste w/o a sizable portion of the cost and trouble - and no need to crockpot it all day, so quick, too.

It's no white meat chicken cooked w/o the skin so it won't taste good, but it's still excellent.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Dio on August 05, 2015, 02:07:31 AM
While I'm not personally a  chicken enthusiast - that does sound rather easy and tasty.

I am posting a link to the website, and to the specific recipe I mentioned in my previous post on this topic, so that anyone who has an interest in this can make it.
Some ideas:
1. I recommend the use of Aluminum Foil in the baking dish to help the washing of dishes through any method.
2. In my area it is also possible to purchase chopped or minced garlic in a jar so that it requires less time chopping or dicing garlic for a reciple.

http://allrecipes.com/recipe/baked-garlic-parmesan-chicken/?mxt=t06dda (http://allrecipes.com/recipe/baked-garlic-parmesan-chicken/?mxt=t06dda)
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Geo on August 05, 2015, 07:17:40 PM
Put frozen freedom fries in oven for 12 minutes @425 degrees.

Are those still sold as such in the States? ;lol
I think the French like it even hotter. ;cute
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on August 05, 2015, 07:30:11 PM
The term Freedom Fries has pretty much disappeared. I was just in a silly mood.

However, I recently learned that the term "hot dog" has similar origins, from WW I. Previously we used both the term "Frankfurter" and "Weiner", but since those names glorified cities in the German and Austro-Hungarian Empires, we invented this alternative.

For that matter, WW I one also ended a lot of German language only schools and churches, and most every town except the city of Pittsburgh,  dropped the "h" in the spelling of their name.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Dio on August 07, 2015, 04:07:40 AM
I cooked home made Beef Enchiladas for dinner tonight :D. The enchiladas had a beef filling that included garlic powder, cumin, oregano, black pepper, paprika, chili powder, onion, tomato sauce, and Worcestershire sauce. The enchiladas were wrapped in fried corn tortillas and inside was the meat with cheese and olives. Lastly, the enchilada sauce was on top of the stuffed tortillas. ;relish
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on August 07, 2015, 04:13:42 AM
Grilled chicken with my BBQ sauce.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on August 07, 2015, 05:00:05 AM
My family is staying with us now.I was too lazy to cook tonight, so we went out for pizza.

I want to talk about the pizza I had tonight, because it was particularly tasty.

Fresh mozzarella, fresh tomato, fresh arugula, shaved parmesan cheese, and parma ham.   
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on August 09, 2015, 06:13:07 PM
As I've mentioned, we came into a gas grill a few months ago.  My wimminz had no prior experience with the things, so I had to talk it up a bit, and got stuck with most of the cooking.  I've been refining my technique as I went, of course.

Gas grilling has the fundamental drawback that you just went to the trouble to stand outside grilling and got food that barely tastes grilled.  What smoky flavor you do get is from the drippings burning.  So I add a couple of handfuls of wood chips in the bottom, and they make it taste grilled.  -But there's a drawback, especially in our old grill that doesn't cook evenly in the first place - it becomes very difficult to control the fire while the wood chips are burning, especially if the meat is fatty enough that the grease burning is significant.  -So, trouble with charring and overcooking.

Recently, I've begun avoid putting anything on the back half of the grill, where the fire naturally burns a lot higher due to an unevenly-corroded old whatsit plate in the bottom.  I'd long since discovered the wisdom of keeping the lid closed as much as possible, to distribute the heat and smoke flavor more evenly - and more intensely in the latter case.  So I'm putting most of the wood in back, and -I discovered this cooking ribs that are usually very fatty and tend to make ferocious grease fires- when the drippin's get the fire good and high -I can usually tell by the sounds coming out- I turn off the gas feed for ten minutes or so, and let it cook solely on the grease fire for a while.  Sometimes, I have to relight afterwards, sometimes I don't.  -But the last set of ribs, and the burgers and bratwurst yesterday, come out juicer and un-or at least far less-burned.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: vonbach on August 10, 2015, 08:42:48 AM
Fish. Eggrolls. Rice. Teriyaki sauce. Profit.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Zoid on August 10, 2015, 05:35:40 PM
Ate some leftovers: kabanos sausage, home made hummus and some spring onions, halved and cooked soft in butter with a handful of leaf parsley and lemon.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: vonbach on August 10, 2015, 05:39:44 PM
Omelet with ramen noodles. Add some hot sauce. Feeds college kids on a budget.
Also Honey and spicy brown mustard makes very good sweet and sour sauce.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on August 10, 2015, 06:02:31 PM
Beef and chicken bullion are not an optional cooking supply, and not expensive or any trouble to add.  Many boiled dishes can benefit, including vegetables.

My brother discovered that trick about 25 years ago - I kept wondering why the green beans he was boiling smelled so good.  This one is especially essential for bachelors and college kids and the like, who don't spend a lot of money or effort on cooking at home - also nutriments added to pastas..

I got my mother doing this with the noodles in the stroganoff, and it improved the quality dramatically (cooking the noodles together with the meat/gray on low for an hour or two is also key fir more than one reason).

Also?  Sometimes you just crave a quick microwave soup at night (or for someone sick) w/o fooling with opening a can.  This is cheaper, too.  -I totally kept bullion on hand in my renfair camping days, when I was living on not much more than peanut butter sandwiches
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: vonbach on August 10, 2015, 06:07:53 PM
Adding chicken broth to rice adds a lot to the flavor. I sometimes do this. :)
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on August 10, 2015, 06:57:36 PM
I even do that when I'm boiling chicken to cook with rice - too much would taste fake by comparison, but a couple of cubes in a big pot enhances the flavor a little.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on August 10, 2015, 09:24:02 PM
Adding chicken broth to rice adds a lot to the flavor. I sometimes do this. :)

I normally do this. I'm glad you brought it up! A simple substitution.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on August 10, 2015, 09:29:48 PM
Doesn't hurt spaghetti noodles a bit, either.  Sometimes you can really taste the pastiness of the pasta if the sauce is a little thin, and some beef bullion in the water while boiling the spaghetti helps.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Elok on August 15, 2015, 07:48:03 PM
Again?

Four great fasts per year, two of them in the summer rather close together.  Fortunately they're (usually) both short, so it's like one with a break in the middle.

Korean Beef Bowl

Slightly modified this from an internet recipe.  For every pound of ground beef, you want a third of a cup of brown sugar, a quarter cup of soy sauce, a tablespoon of hot sesame oil, and a bit of ground ginger.  If you don't have ground ginger, I can confirm that other types work fine.  Anyway, mix the sugar, soy, oil, and ginger (if powdered) together into a slurry while the beef browns.  Once it's brown, add three cloves of minced garlic and cook very briefly--about a minute--to activate it.  Raw ginger, in slices, should go in at the same time if you didn't have powdered.  Either way, once you smell garlic you chuck on the slurry and cook for maybe five minutes, stirring occasionally.  Serve the end result over rice.  It's hot, sweet and salty all at once, I love it.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on August 15, 2015, 08:13:25 PM
Kinda sorta fits here.

I'm making tomato sauce today. (and likely the next few saturdays)  While it's too time consuming to really call it lazy, it DOES make future tomato based meals lazy.  Can or freeze.  You'll need to salt to taste when you USE the sauce though.  Recipe from a Sicilian lady. 

Quote
This is an easy, if time consuming recipe.

25 lbs tomatoes. Personally, I like Roma. We grew about half our own last year, hoping to do better than that this year.

Just wash and quarter those and throw them into a nice big stock pot with the following:

1 cup of olive oil
3\4 cup of red wine
1\3 cup of herbs. You can use what you like, We used Rosemary and Basil in ours.
Head of garlic, broken into cloves
2 large bell peppers
1 large onion
Couple of Bay Leaves

Take a potato masher and just crush all that together, then bring it to a boil and simmer it down until a good amount of the juice is gone. The house will smell divine.

Now, if you want to be all traditional like you can run this mixture through a tomato strainer…personally…god made blenders to make such jobs easier. So, strain or blender it into a separate bowl.

Once it’s all strained/blendered simmer some more if you are too runny, or can/preserve it via your most comfortable method.

There you have a fantastic base to make into pasta, pizza, or other sauce.

I have a stick blender now, so it's SUPER easy.  No separate bowl nonsense. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: vonbach on August 15, 2015, 08:21:49 PM
My brother makes stuffed chicken. He bones it dices green olives and puts them under the skin and
puts paprika and lemon zest on the skin. The cat gets the olive bottle lid and lemons make great cat repellant.
Title: BU's Chicken and Rice
Post by: Buster's Uncle on August 17, 2015, 03:04:26 PM
Not fast, but very cheap and low-effort:

Big pot of water and chicken on simmer for two hours(+) - less if you must, and don't prefer the chicken boned.

I season with salt, black pepper, a touch of garlic, a lot of sage and moderate basil - moderate/heavy parsley don't hurt anything, either, but I'm not sure it helps.  Spice to your own tastes, and those of anyone else you anticipate partaking.  I do throw in two cubes of beef bullion for good measure, and sometimes some margarine if I think the chickens were too skinny.

Boiling chicken is not the very best cooking smell ever, and the basil pays off in how much better the house smells, alone.

Leave that sucker simmering for a long time, being careful not let unwatched pot issues happen, like boiling over or boiling off all the broth and burning everything.  A little experience will allow you to leave it unattended for the two hours while you run your forum, a kind of cooking I specialize in.

Timers that make a noise you can hear where you'll be are a very good idea for these put-on-and-wait dishes...

When the broth has boiled down to about two cups (or whatever is appropriate to the amount of chicken and how much rice you'll want, and so on) and the chicken is boned, measure the broth and add half that volume in rice.  Follow the instructions on the rice.

Guy protip on boning boiled chicken:  Do not pick through the pot for the bones to remove - remove all the chicken onto a plate and put only the meat back.  You'll find a lot less tiny bones in your meal later that way.

-If you want vegetables in, add them about an hour before you estimate you'll be ready for the rice.  Boiling them as long as the chicken will turn them to mush.

Do try the garlic, sage and basil -delicious, according to the proportions your tongue prefers- and don't forget the salt and pepper; it's not nearly as good if you add them while you eat.

My writeup makes it sound involved, and it's not: pot, water, chicken, spice, simmer, bone, rice.  Eat.  Rub belly.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on August 17, 2015, 03:27:10 PM
boiling any kind of bones is putrid.  :sick:
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on August 17, 2015, 03:31:11 PM
They were inside the chicken parts when they showed up, I'm afraid.

About 24 years ago, I DID boil the chicken bones leftover from this dish some more to soften them for my brother's big dog and make a broth to pour over his food....
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on August 17, 2015, 03:37:22 PM
They were inside the chicken parts when they showed up, I'm afraid.

All the worse.   Believe we've covered my issues with fowl carcasses before. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on August 17, 2015, 03:38:39 PM
I'm not remembering a chicken story.

This food thread is probably not the right place, anyway.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on August 17, 2015, 06:10:58 PM
Just don't care for anything with bones or skin in/on it.  Turkey day is a challenge.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on August 17, 2015, 06:16:59 PM
If there's a childhood trauma story or something, I'm interested - in your own thread...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on August 17, 2015, 09:43:32 PM
Not really trauma just a long slow growing dislike for skin and bones.  Since fowl seems to be the most common thing people eat with skin and bones still attached, a growing dread for turkey day...

I mean I COULD carve a turkey if it was needed for practical or etiquette purposes.  I would hate every minute and probably not be able to eat, but I could.  hEt's kind enough to boil the monstrousity that is left behind after turkey day while I'm gone. 

One of these days I might do it myself and articulate the skeleton afterwords as therapy, since hEt ruins the bones. 

Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on August 17, 2015, 10:03:19 PM
You probably ought to do that.  History indicates it would give you a lot better handle on your feelings about it.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Dio on August 17, 2015, 10:58:50 PM
Not really trauma just a long slow growing dislike for skin and bones.  Since fowl seems to be the most common thing people eat with skin and bones still attached, a growing dread for turkey day...

I mean I COULD carve a turkey if it was needed for practical or etiquette purposes.  I would hate every minute and probably not be able to eat, but I could.  hEt's kind enough to boil the monstrousity that is left behind after turkey day while I'm gone. 

One of these days I might do it myself and articulate the skeleton afterwords as therapy, since hEt ruins the bones.
??? This makes very little sense because you build models of creatures with bone analogs. I cannot deny that sawing bones emits a repugant odor.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on August 18, 2015, 03:32:05 AM
"Analogs".  Sure. Keep telling yourself that.  It's about 50/50. Real/analog.


I know it makes no sense. I like nice clean dry bones. Don't like wet bones with flesh still hanging on.  Maybe somewhere butchering our own food as a child got to me on a delayed reaction. 

Skin is worse that bone though. I can eat a t bone for instance.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on August 18, 2015, 03:59:52 AM
Actually Uno, I'm eating the marrow out of fried chicken bones as I type this...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on August 18, 2015, 01:40:20 PM
ghoul. 

Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on August 18, 2015, 01:43:35 PM
It was delicious.  No kiddin' - very late supper, and I was hungry.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Elok on August 22, 2015, 01:57:27 AM
Garlic-butter chicken:

Chop up chicken breast into little chunks.  Brown in a generous amount of butter.  Deglaze with equal parts white wine and chicken broth, add minced garlic, and cook it down into a sauce.  At the end, toss the chicken back in and stir to coat, then squeeze in half a lemon or so.  We generally serve it over rice with green beans.  It's luscious.  I didn't mention any proportions because we tend to eyeball it.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on September 07, 2015, 04:34:30 AM
A word on popcorn:

it's incredibly cheap, of course, bought as bags of nothing but kernels - the salt and oil you add yourself will end up setting you back more, I think.  Mylochka had a friend in grad school who discovered she had no money in her budget for food and survived -barely, I imagine- on popcorn for a semester.  (Peanut butter has it beat all hollow -popcorn is hollow, being mostly air- for nutritional value in something very cheap, but I guess not cheap enough for her, poor dear.)

And so I, a practicing miser, approve of the popcorn popped on the stove w/ salt and oil as a very economical snack food.

-But there's this, that I came here to say: sometimes I get a strong craving for something greasy, salty and snacky, usually late at night, and a big production standing over the stove just don't cut it.  Microwave popcorn is scandalously expensive by comparison, but time and convenience does have non-trivial value, and two minutes nuking, and Bam! you're eating a sack of potato chips' still hecka-cheap cousin.

Microwave popcorn. ;b;
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on September 08, 2015, 09:19:29 PM
Oh. POPCORN! 

If you ever have a school kid coming buy selling this stuff, it's worth it. 

http://www.braxfundraising.com/fundraising-products/spiritpopcorn/ (http://www.braxfundraising.com/fundraising-products/spiritpopcorn/)

They must salt that stuff with crack or something.  Best microwave corn I've ever had. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on September 09, 2015, 03:45:10 AM
While we're discussing corn...

If you're only cooking for one or two, you can use the microwave to cook an ear of sweet corn in the husk. 1 ear, 4 minutes. 2 ears, 8 minutes.

Use a glove or oven mitt to remove it, it will be hot. 
Use a knife to cut of the butt end of the ear ( cut so as to remove the first ring of kernels )
Squeezing from the silk end, you can push the ear out through the cut.

Gourmet because it tastes great, Lazy because it's the easiest way to completely de-silk an ear of corn. As you probably know, cooked corn silk tastes like lawn clippings smell.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on September 09, 2015, 03:54:00 AM
...We did an experiment with grilling unshucked corn about a month ago.  Not setting fire to it is tricky, but leaving it laying on the upper shelf on some aluminum foil while the ribs grill was too slow.  Mylochka pronounced the end-result definitely worth further research.  Not that lazy, and likely nothing grilled counts as gourmet, but M sez delicious...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on September 09, 2015, 05:20:09 PM

Recreated Pit Roast Offers a Taste of Stone Age Life (http://alphacentauri2.info/index.php?topic=16914.msg81379#msg81379)
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on September 09, 2015, 06:32:27 PM
That was interesting. There's something about the early stages of social organization that I find appealing..

Perhaps it's uniting the wandering tribes into a CIVILISATION!   

Anyway, While it could have taken years to build, if it was the site of an annual gathering/festival ( reminds me of the mountain men's annual Rendezvous in the American Rockies in the early to mid 1800s ) , they could agree to build it, and have everyone carry one river stone up the hill while they are there. That would be very symbolic. Or turn it into a strong man's contest, to see who could carry the most head sized stones up the hill in an afternoon. Same kind of thing with digging. With prizes and libation, that could be fun. Much the same as a barn raising.

Extended families are able to do massive amounts of work in a single day, like replacing a roof or butchering.  Communities can clean up a river.  If it's something done by and for a community, it wouldn't have to take years to build.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on September 09, 2015, 06:40:49 PM
While we're discussing corn...

If you're only cooking for one or two, you can use the microwave to cook an ear of sweet corn in the husk. 1 ear, 4 minutes. 2 ears, 8 minutes.

Use a glove or oven mitt to remove it, it will be hot. 
Use a knife to cut of the butt end of the ear ( cut so as to remove the first ring of kernels )
Squeezing from the silk end, you can push the ear out through the cut.

Gourmet because it tastes great, Lazy because it's the easiest way to completely de-silk an ear of corn. As you probably know, cooked corn silk tastes like lawn clippings smell.



*sigh*

It's not that hard to get the silk off people.  Use a toothbrush or vegetable brush.  DRY, don't put water on the corn. 

Microwave...may as well just throw the corn out....people should try it raw anyway...


Quote
...We did an experiment with grilling unshucked corn about a month ago.  Not setting fire to it is tricky, but leaving it laying on the upper shelf on some aluminum foil while the ribs grill was too slow.  Mylochka pronounced the end-result definitely worth further research.  Not that lazy, and likely nothing grilled counts as gourmet, but M sez delicious...

Did you soak it first? 

So, "THE" way to do this is to peel the husk back to the base, remove the silk, and replace the husk.  Soak in a bucket of water for 20 minutes, then place directly on the grill for ~20 minutes, rolling every 5. 


There's a street vendor in ogden here that serves "Mexican corn on the cob".  I haven't decided if the name is offensive or not yet. 

Anyhow, he has a big steam cart full of cooked corn.  When you order, he takes the corn cob and removes the kernels into a cup (so, it's not on a cob anymore, and thus I'm uncertain of the offense...), then mixes cheese, guacamole, sour cream, and hot sauce into it.  Stuff is FANTASTIC.  Remember offering it at one of our pumpkin carves and no one knew what I was talking about.   
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on September 09, 2015, 06:59:34 PM
It was a first try, and not my idea.  I was surprised the grilled flavor did anything for corn.  Our biggest error was leaving ALL the husks on.  It needed to be stripped down to one or two layers; the whole shebang left on for most of the cook time insulated it too much from the heat and smoke alike.  I'll remember the soaking trick if we get ahold of anymore unshucked corn to try with this season.


That was interesting. There's something about the early stages of social organization that I find appealing..

Perhaps it's uniting the wandering tribes into a CIVILISATION!   

Anyway, While it could have taken years to build, if it was the site of an annual gathering/festival ( reminds me of the mountain men's annual Rendezvous in the American Rockies in the early to mid 1800s ) , they could agree to build it, and have everyone carry one river stone up the hill while they are there. That would be very symbolic. Or turn it into a strong man's contest, to see who could carry the most head sized stones up the hill in an afternoon. Same kind of thing with digging. With prizes and libation, that could be fun. Much the same as a barn raising.

Extended families are able to do massive amounts of work in a single day, like replacing a roof or butchering.  Communities can clean up a river.  If it's something done by and for a community, it wouldn't have to take years to build.
HEY, I think you have good insight, there.  That just has that ring of a thing that when you hear it, you know it's true/right.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on September 12, 2015, 03:36:22 AM
I repeated this talk of corn, Rusty's microwave trick and Uno's soaking advice for grilling, to my wimminz the other day, and of course that meant Mylochka voted ribs, soonest, and today I had to grill supper.

Uno, the soaking seemed to work.  Mom put two ears in a deep pan of water a couple hours in advance, turning them a few times.  She peeled the husks until the corn was almost uncovered, and I put the corn on the upper grill shelf on a piece of aluminum foil as before -this time with the edges crumbled upwards and a touch of water in the bottom, which mostly just kept the corn from trying to roll off until the heat flattened the foil.  Up on the shelf, soaked and not quite completely shucked seemed to do the trick.  Mylochka said it was done enough, not too much, and had a good smokiness.  (Mom don't care about it smoked, and I don't eat corn due to far too many childhood force-feedings.  I wish I'd thrown up while Daddy was doing it far sooner than age 14, since it seemed to break him of that charming parental habit.  Protip: do that too much, and someday when they're too big to force, they will never eat whatever again; you saw to that.)


If anyone uses that idea of making up for the low smokiness on a gas grill with some wood in the bottom?  1.) Little broken off sticks of whatever long-dead branchlets off the brush pile at the edge of the yard seem to make no difference from store-bought bags of applewood chips.  Also, free.  A pecan tree is right over my grilling place, so I know old dead pecan wood works.  2.) I don't know why damp wood smokes more -I'd assumed it was just more visible because steam, but you can smell the difference, even old, dead, not-green wood- but if you can prepare/plan ahead a little, see that your wood will be damp in advance to give it time to soak in a little.  I seem to get better smokiness results even when I forget and have to spray the wood thoroughly right before I light the grill.  Surely, it causes the wood to burn out a bit slower and gives you a little better control of the initial heat...

My working theory now is that the expanding steam carries more particulate matter into the air in the smoke.  Uno?
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on September 18, 2015, 01:21:33 AM
Note on my previous advice to dampen deadwood/brush in a gas grill for smoke flavor:  for once, I bothered to wet the wood by immersion far in advance, and you can definitely overdo this.  I grilled chicken two days ago and threw leftover wood in a bucket; today, it was burgers for supper, and I had left the wood in there and only took it out at grill time - in 20 minutes, half of it didn't dry enough to light.  I didn't really think that was possible, the way the gas flame comes disproportionately out the back in our worn old grill, but wood too wet to burn smokes even less than super-dry wood.  We did get less burning of the food, though, and I can now confirm that a couple (2) charcoal briquettes makes a non-trivial difference in flavor.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on September 24, 2015, 09:48:57 PM
I just got drafted to grill bratwurst and dogs; be back when I'm back.  Y'all try not to wreck up the place too bad while I'm afk...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on September 25, 2015, 02:56:01 AM
I didn't think anyone would obey.  Y'all suck at wrecking up a place.

The brats were delicious.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on January 03, 2016, 09:57:52 PM
Life is getting interesting. My MIL is losing her mind due to mixed dementia. So sometimes she double salts cookies, for example, or leaves an iron skillet full of grease from last week's meal in the oven while she makes other stuff in the oven...

That and the recent inlaw blow-up means that I'm doing more of the cooking, often on short notice and with dynamic head counts. I'm geared to cooking for two. Recipes, pot and pan sizes, inventory of fresh and frozen foods.

In the last year since the god-daughter moved in, that has been two ( plus one after work sometimes ). So that meant preparing a serving to be either warmed up or completed later that evening depending on the demands of her work. )

So my wife volunteers for me to cook dinner when her cousin came to visit. Great! I like this cousin. Wife figures a beef stew, because she's talking about having MIL over, maybe her husband later, and eventually a variable number of nieces.

Well, I have a blood donation scheduled that afternoon, and most of the stew work is done in the afternoon. But, cooking dinner for more than four on the stove top means repeating recipes, because  my stuff isn't big enough to do my popular meals for say 5+ 2 , or however many the variable head count was . So, I settled on two  options- 1) The beef stew, but that meant that the wife would have to do some things while I was away, including monitoring the temp.. 2) Grilled chicken with corn and mashed potatoes, which meant her watching the stove top for that one.

She chose #2 . I had some frozen chicken filets from COSTCO in the freezer. They'd been there too long, and were a little icy and dried, being the bottom of the bag. I defrosted/drained/rinsed them and marinated them in some Lemon/Ginger/sesame salad dressing.  I had done this once before, and it was a hit with wife and goddaughter, because they like Asian flavors. 

More importantly, it was a major hit with the guest of honor. She wanted to know why the chicken was so moist... Also she said it was the best frozen corn she'd ever had. I gave her some from the freezer to take home. I figured she could eat what my brother in law wasn't going to get. Also, we made plans for me to teach her how to process corn this summer. She has a co-worker corn source.

I would like to credit Bill Clinton, who I once read liked steak marinated in bottled salad dressing, maybe it was Ranch. I could never bring myself to do that to a steak...but a chicken, why not?
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: vonbach on January 04, 2016, 12:30:09 PM
My brother makes a chicken breast dish stuffed with olives and seasoned with paprika and lemon zest thats nice.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on January 04, 2016, 07:00:12 PM
My latest seems to be Enchiladas.  Since my first time trying to make them, I've found everyone else's sauce to be inadequate. 

Melt a cube of butter, brown onions and garlic in it, make a roux with the resulting mix, pour in a can of chicken broth, 2 cans of tomato sauce, and season to taste with chili powder and cumin, simmer to desired consistency.   

I like to take half that sauce, and cook the meat with it in the crock pot for 6+ hours, and use the other half to pour over the top after making the enchiladas. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: abc123 on January 06, 2016, 06:48:37 AM
I'm fairly non specific -- whatever looks like it would spoil first goes into the pot. Sometimes it becomes a decent meat & vege stew.

If I buy Rotini, I get the three color kind.  :)
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on January 07, 2016, 12:14:55 AM
I'm fairly non specific -- whatever looks like it would spoil first goes into the pot. Sometimes it becomes a decent meat & vege stew.

If I buy Rotini, I get the three color kind.  :)

That's my favorite pasta! It holds sauce so well, and it's not messy to eat like spaghetti and angel hair.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Elok on January 08, 2016, 11:43:11 PM
I invented "ugly chicken" a while back.  You make a roux (butter and flour), add chicken broth (I use homemade stuff from our pressure cooker), garlic, thyme, lemon juice and/or white wine, pepper, and pre-cooked chicken (generally produced as a byproduct of the broth, or vice-versa).  Usually I add some frozen spinach too.  The result looks like vomit, hence the name.  But it's sublimely tasty when served over noodles.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Elok on January 11, 2016, 12:47:58 AM
If you have never tried unstabilized ricotta, you should.  Check the ingredients list; most of the stuff in groceries is loaded down with guar gum or what-have-you, and has a weird texture and/or gross aftertaste.  If it's just milk, vinegar, and salt, though . . . hoo boy!  Light, fluffy, creamy, and faintly sweet.  I just eat it with a spoon, like ice cream.

Cabot's full-fat Greek yogurt is a roughly similar sort of pleasure, but heavier and pricier.  Ten percent milkfat, no added flavor, beats that sugary Yoplait junk hollow.  But at some point you have to put down the spoon and confront the fact that you aren't all that far removed from just biting hunks straight off a stick of butter.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on January 11, 2016, 07:39:05 PM
Attempting a crock pot chicken curry today.  Made last night, cooking all day, will taste tonight. 

Something of an offshoot of the enchiladas above in some ways.  Differing spices, but similar methods. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on January 12, 2016, 04:18:49 PM
Attempting a crock pot chicken curry today.  Made last night, cooking all day, will taste tonight. 
Turned into a passable Murgh Mahkani (spelling) Indian butter chicken. 

Well, everyone else loved it, so I guess it was a success in that way.  In fact, it's the boss's favorite now.  (it tasted fine, but has enough dairy to bother my digestion)  I still prefer my Tikka Masala, but do at the restaurants as well. 

Mostly just annoyed at a couple minor mistakes I made:

I totally underestimated the amount of liquid the frozen chicken was going to add to the thing as it cooked.  This meant I had to take it out of the crock pot and add flower to thicken the sauce on the stove.  Better planning would have avoided that.  Heck.  REALLY advanced planning and I would have the more authentic ground cashews on hand to thicken the sauce instead of flour. 

It was on the spicy end for the kids because I underestimated how much the cayenne was going to strengthen overnight. 

Anyhow:

2 cubes butter
5 cloves garlic
3 T ground ginger
large onion diced
sautee all that together till the onion is clear. 
Then make a thin roux out of the results. 

Add 4 cups chicken broth, 1 can diced tomatoes, 1 can tomato sauce. 

Bring to a simmer. 
Add 3 T tandoori blend
3 T curry powder
1 T cayenne
Salt to taste

Separately, roughly 26 frozen boneless/skinless chicken tenderloin strips, cubed.

Throw it all in the crock pot overnight, and put it on low the next morning for 10+ hours. 

30 minutes before serving, add heavy cream to the desired consistency. 

(Next time, I'll cut the broth in half, as I had to add flour here to thicken it further)

So more of a work today to be lazy all week thing, as it cooks enough for 3 meals for us (though the 'other' meals are more lunches for hEt as she works, and dinners for the kids cause I'm lazy)
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on January 12, 2016, 11:10:38 PM
I haven't been enthused about eating and cooking recently, because of having some crowns put in.

Surprisingly, my wife has stepped up. Scrambled eggs and hash browns last night, baked potatoes and chicken Kiev/ Cordon Blue( from frozen ) , and tomorrow will be tacos ( if we don't go out ). I will probably have to dice tomatoes and shred lettuce for that.

The point is that having the mrs. take over cooking is deliciously lazy.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on February 27, 2016, 11:17:45 PM
This has been a peculiar  week. The family has been packing my M-I-L's  stuff/ cleaning her house because she has mixed dementia and moved into a nursing home on Thursday. I've been cooking with no idea how many people will show up. I was needed for the actual move, so I made this because I had most of the ingredients and no time to shop or cook -

http://tiphero.com/creamy-chicken-wild-rice-soup/ (http://tiphero.com/creamy-chicken-wild-rice-soup/)

Everybody seemed to approve. I used all chicken stock and no water.  I substituted corn for celery, but we all agreed that it would be better with twice as much corn. I thought the black pepper overpowered the more subtle flavors, and it would have been even better with less and the addition of mushrooms. My niece added sirracha  sauce.

Anyway, easy, tasty, made a lot of food. Trust your instincts on the seasoning. It's easier to add to your bowl than remove from the batch. Enjoy!
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on February 27, 2016, 11:22:05 PM
Are put-on-and-leave-cooking-low-for-two-hours recipes right for this thread?  I've mostly posted about grilling, 'cause that was what I did constantly this summer, but I specialize more in leave-cooking dishes...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on February 27, 2016, 11:54:35 PM
Are put-on-and-leave-cooking-low-for-two-hours recipes right for this thread?  I've mostly posted about grilling, 'cause that was what I did constantly this summer, but I specialize more in leave-cooking dishes...

Well, it says "Lazy Gourmet".. I interpret that as easy and tasty. Although usually I maintain that gourmet is a French word for "The chef put his fingers in my food!" In other words, lots of fussing.

That's how I look at it. Grilling can be pretty lazy, but sometimes it requires a lot of fuss/basting/injecting supervision.

Slow cooking can be pretty lazy, provided there aren't too many ingredients to be measured or prepped.

I say, if it's both tasty and easy- share!
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on February 28, 2016, 12:27:43 AM
Well, cooking is NOT one of life's more onerous chores - but I've encouraged my natural laziness there, to cut down on elaborate midnight snacks (used to do midnight frying pan steak a lot) and yeah, my specialties are focused on high return in relation to effort and time spent.

I was thinking about posting my roasted chicken recipe the last time I made it -about a week ago- and thinking that Elok was asking for QUICK stopped me.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Elok on February 28, 2016, 04:42:56 AM
Nah, just not Food Network-y "you need twelve obscure ingredients, a bizarre single-purpose kitchen implement, and three hours prep time."
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on February 28, 2016, 04:45:31 AM
Not much to the chicken recipe (protip: main ingredient chicken) then, but not tonight.

Bed's singing to me.
Title: Roasted Chicken
Post by: Buster's Uncle on February 28, 2016, 05:41:09 PM
I stumbled over this one by accident - there was a bunch of frozen leg quarters in the freezer, I'd been away on the road for over six months doing renfairs, and the freezer was self-cleaning, so the meat was probably bad.  Chicken is incredibly cheap, bought in those big sacks of leg-thigh-back quarters most groceries offer; cheaper than hamburger, so we're not talking about but a few dollars wasted if I had to feed them to the dogs.  However, I don't believe in feeding dogs food any staler than it has to be, so I threw the old quarters onto a pan in the oven and cooked them low for a few hours.

Thing is, after a few hours, it was smelling really good, so I bit into a piece - and the dogs ended up getting nothing.  I've refined the technique considerably since then.



Preheat the oven to bake at approximately 365 degrees - as always with my recipes, I recommend experimentation to suit your own tastes and those of people you cook for; it's how I worked out all my specialties in the first place.

Lightly Pam-spray a roughly 1'x2' pan and place 4-6 frozen leg quarters as separated as they'll fit without touching much.  Salt to taste - unless you just don't like/eat ANY salt, meat needs a little while it's cooking; trying to make up for it at the table on meat cooked completely w/o is never satisfactory.

-The other spices are optional, depending on how much you like pure, crunchy, golden brown chicken, but I worked out my standard spice regime on this dish to suit my sister's more sophisticated tastes - she liked when she came home from work and supper was waiting, provided I could make it so she liked it.  (I like it about equally either way.)  So, a little black pepper, a little garlic (or a lot, depending on what you like), a lot of sage and a little basil.

Two hours should be just about perfect for well-browned, depending on your preferences and altitude.


Optionally, at roughly an hour 1/2, pull out and use a fork to transfer the congealing pan scrapin's on top of the meat before they cook to the pan, to save yourself a lot of trouble later cleaning.  Also optional; Mylochka liked to pour a little bag of mixed frozen vegetables in one corner around 'her' piece at a half hour to completion to cook in the chicken juices.  She said they were delicious, and it gave everything in the pan a sort of Thanksgiving turkey flavor, I thought.

Now, Mom don't like it as crispy as I do, so if you or anyone you cook for feels that way, it's key to pay attention to how long it takes for the water to cook off the broth in the pan, leaving browned scrapin's and fat; it comes out kinda slimy and gross on the bottom if you pull the chicken out before - though it's cooked enough to eat well before the time I give at the temperature I give.  She makes that mistake a lot when she bakes chicken without me.  So the trick is to give it ten-15 minutes to brown on the bottom after the broth's cooked down to just fat as a compromise.  (Note that my way, the meat cooks drier -but still tender and delicious - which resists taking on that refrigerator taste that leftover chicken tends to get, better.)

Since chickens are not all the same size, there is a limit to how much consistency you can get; a little less time or a little lower temperature for smaller leg quarters.  -Cooking's like that, for all my efforts at consistency.

Another thing to experiment with is lower temperatures longer - 260 for three hours will cook but not brown, so hotter than that.

I get stuck a lot having to do this with chicken cut up into discrete thighs and drumsticks -Mom almost always buys the quarters but cuts them up- and it's enormously trickier with smaller pieces.  Big leg quarters are by far the easiest to get good results with.

And again - garlic can really overwhelm a dish, but this is a garlic chicken recipe if you put enough on, or not if just a hint of it.  So that's up to preference.  DO sage the heck out of it.

One last thing:  slop on BBQ sauce (my sauce recipe leads page two of this thread) and cook for ten more minutes, and this is a BBQ Chicken recipe -some lemon juice on the chicken, added to the other pre-cooking spices, goes well with this- one trick a good cook learns is (easy) ways to add variety to the same ol' thing...



Cooks enough to feed me for two days, if I'm doing all the eating alone.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on February 28, 2016, 08:37:56 PM
I should have said a little more about adapting this recipe for smaller pieces - those will cook too dry, done the same as I instruct for leg quarters.  You need to shave time off and cook hotter to brown the skin without overcooking the meat.  I've never really worked out how much of each, satisfactorily.

I've also never done this with non-frozen chicken; 15-20 minutes less might be necessary to compensate, but a little hotter again might be needed, too.  I'm completely guessing, though.

Cooking skinless I know nothing about, except that it's a bad idea for multiple reasons.  -If anyone wants to be healthy and eat forth-rate-tasting chicken, I would suggest cooking unseasoned with the skin on for the first hour -chicken tastes awful without any of the skinfat- removing the skin, then spicing and cooking the rest of the time.  (A little less time, probably; I imagine it'll cook dry faster without skin.)
Title: Chicken Racku
Post by: Buster's Uncle on March 01, 2016, 01:11:31 AM
I've mentioned grilling chicken, I think, but I don't recall having talked about how.

The same aunt who gave us the old gas grill (it was crumbling, and I was given a new one for my birthday in December, something that for family in-joke reasons is called 'giving a football', after a teenage boy on some sitcom who gave his mother a football for Christmas, and they didn't entirely have MY happiness in mind in giving me a new grill to cook for them on) gave us a wire rack that you hang drumsticks on, wide end down.  I didn't think it would work -chicken has the fat in the skin and wants to burn like crazy laying directly on the grill- but it does, and is excellent with a little of my BBQ sauce painted on the last five minutes of grilling and a little more added on the plate.

So, get a rack like I have, cook for about 45 minutes, sauce the last five, hope you guessed the time right to neither over or undercook, manage the possible grease fires and don't burn it much - and enjoy.

I'm really only posting because I cooked Chicken Racku for supper today with more success than usual - and my wiminz always likes it-  and to mention the name.  I'd been watching a lot of subtitled anime at the time, thus the Engrish name.
Title: Beef Stew
Post by: Buster's Uncle on March 01, 2016, 08:15:37 PM
This one's not easy to screw up - don't over-salt it, watch out for overstuffing the pot, causing something to push against the bottom and burn, and you should be golden, provided there's nothing wrong with the ingredients.

Fill one of those two gallon pots about half full and set on the stove at low medium, about one third of the way if your stove has a dial.  Add chunked beef (Mom cuts up a smallish roast for this and freezes.)  Salt and pepper.  Simmer for 1-2 hours, depending on how tender you want the beef - tender enough to not stay together on a fork is more than most people prefer, which should take a bit more time than I'm laying out; almost that tender is usually ideal.  Cut up enough potatoes, carrots, celery (and whatever suits you - at least a little onion, in addition, can be good) to nearly fill the pot -beef stew with vegetables stretches a piece of meat a long way, a common attribute of southern cooking- add, and simmer another hour.  Eat, possibly with broth-soppin' biscuits.

-Optionally, the standard set of spices I put on most meat dishes - a little garlic, a lot of sage, and a little basil.

-I like to throw a couple bullion cubes in to make the broth even richer (without that fake bullion taste), but it doesn't make a huge difference.

-Also optionally; it's not very good with extremely lean meat and no fat.  I actually add a little bacon fat from the grease can, and get very delicious results.  That's possibly more important if you don't put on the optional spices, as boiled dishes can turn out terribly bland.


When spicing, it's better to underdo than over, always, but the vegetables end up being a lot to spice - I go heavier salting/spicing on boiled dishes for that reason.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on March 01, 2016, 09:31:39 PM
There's a reason I'm always mentioning spicing to taste - and that of others who will eat it.  I like things saltier than anyone I know - Mom likes saltier than most people, and my sister and aunt -who's here for the week- are normal.  I have to always be conscious of not salting to my own taste unless I'm the only one I'm cooking for.  The batch of stew cooking now may be a little too peppery, so when I went to check on it and found Mom had taken care of the vegetables, I chopped up three more potatoes and added to divide the spices that much further.  Aunt Pokey's hard to please, and you definitely have to cook for your audience.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on March 04, 2016, 02:47:57 AM
...On that last, the post-meal feeback was that the meat and vegetables were perfect, but the both was indeed a tad too peppery - they agreed with my own assessment however, that it was only a tad over; my mouth was a little warmer when I finished my serving than I'd prefer, but not on fire...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on March 04, 2016, 05:09:06 AM
Yes, you have to cook for your audience.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on March 04, 2016, 03:34:33 PM
-Which a bachelor cooking for himself does instinctively - but if the wife don't like mushrooms, you probably shouldn't be putting mushroom soup into everything.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on March 05, 2016, 03:59:53 AM
-Which a bachelor cooking for himself does instinctively - but if the wife don't like mushrooms, you probably shouldn't be putting mushroom soup into everything.

Kind of my problem, coming from the top mushroom producing state. I'm always thinking how this or that could use mushrooms of some kind, but not only is my wife allergic to mold and fungus, she thinks they taste like dirt.  Same with much of her family.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on March 05, 2016, 04:04:31 AM
You are my mom and I am the wife.  Funny I used that example.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on March 09, 2016, 08:24:07 PM
Just put on the chicken to boil for a suppertime chicken and rice, as recipe'd pages back.

I recall taking earlier in the thread about bullion being a pretty essential supply for any cook, especially lazy gourmets/bachelors, and I should also mention lemon juice (or at least vinegar; they can be used for a lot of the same things in a pinch, with vinegar making up for not tasting as good by being much cheaper and almost never going bad).  It's another thing not expensive to keep around, and as I said recently, one trick a good cook learns is (easy) ways to add variety to the same ol' thing.  Sometimes a touch of lemon is just right for that.

Invest in a few basic spices beyond salt and pepper for the same reason.  Find what you like, change up the proportions occasionally.  I went a little heavier on the garlic than usual this time...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on March 09, 2016, 09:44:35 PM
Invest in a few basic spices beyond salt and pepper for the same reason.  Find what you like, change up the proportions occasionally.  I went a little heavier on the garlic than usual this time...

I've noticed new packages at the store.  A little card that has 3-5 blister packs of seasoning and instructions to make some kind of meal with them.  They'd be a good way to figure out which spices you like, then buy those spices in the bottles. 

Another thing I did when first starting out is read the actual ingredients on pre-packed blends I liked.  That "Cajun spice" is good, what's in it? type thing, then try them separately. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on March 09, 2016, 09:48:46 PM
I worked mine out by going through my sister's spice rack reading descriptions on the labels and trying everything that was supposed to be good on chicken.  The whole set I settled on is also great on pork and beef.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on March 09, 2016, 11:18:29 PM
I just had to do some of that there, whatchacallit, improvising.

I was cooking because Momma is gone over to Aunt Wanda's house for something, and she was going to cook the same thing (had boiled and frozen chicken and broth last week for this sort of occasion) which I had been craving for several days and had meant to suggest.  She told me to go ahead and cook my own small batch.  What the heck.

Yeah; I pull the chicken out to bone and go to get the rice before I measure the broth- and no rice.  Not even in the pitiful emergency cache in the basement.  She knew I was going to make same, but forgot I needed rice to do it, and that Wanda surely had plenty on hand.  And I couldn't even find nearly enough of the squiggly noodles to substitute.  A handful.  I found a couple of packs of instant ramen, and made do with one and a half of those on top of what squigglies I had.  (why there's never any macaroni noodles in this house, or flat noodles that are actually flat is a mystery to me.)

[shrugs] Eating at the keyboard.  It's not bad...  I should have looked around for spaghetti noodles, though...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on March 10, 2016, 05:02:07 AM
There were no spaghetti noodles after all.  Momma admitted when she came home that she realized she'd short-sheeted me when she was putting in the rice at her sister's house...  Oh well.

I added several items to the grocery list, including rice for the basement emergency supplies - those get rotated more often than we expected; we DO sometimes save ourselves short-term privation or an extra grocery trip, and usually remember to replenish...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on March 10, 2016, 08:15:57 PM
It absolutely not LAZY gourmet stuff, and it's not even a recipe; rather, a philosophy - but any interest in The Way of the Pizza God?
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on March 10, 2016, 08:32:29 PM
Why not?

One tip or new idea could prove useful.

A couple years ago we finally found a local place where we both loved the pizza, but they morphed into a bistro, and the pizza selection and options is pretty small now. In the process it also morphed into someplace we're indifferent about. We can eat there, but we wouldn't make an effort to go there.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on March 10, 2016, 09:13:23 PM
I'll say little caesar's deep dish is surprisingly good. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on March 10, 2016, 09:14:55 PM
It is.



The TL;DR first:  MOAR!  Always put as much toppings on a pizza as is physically possible w/o them ending up on the bottom of the oven burning.  -And Chicago-style, because a thick crust is the only part besides the sauce that isn't hideously expensive.

People LOVED my crusts back in college.


I'll expand on this later...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on March 10, 2016, 09:18:12 PM
Ok. 

REAL Chicago style, or the mass marketed anything with a thick crust = Chicago style?


Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on March 10, 2016, 09:19:55 PM
Uno's speciality of late is a French bread pizza. 

Owing mostly to the fact that breads elude me (so no pizza crust, I'll buy a premade French bread thanks), and the fact I'm REALLY good at tomato sauces. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on March 10, 2016, 09:20:43 PM
....now I'm hungry and don't want to be here. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on March 10, 2016, 09:31:39 PM
;lol

I've never had Chicago style - just, what I'm led to understand it is sounds much like what I worked out for myself in college.

It's not so far as a pie or a casserole, but it's thick, very thick, and all about overkill.  Pizza is not a health food, ever, so why front instead of going delicious and a lot of it?

If you can eat more than one piece at a sitting, you're a pig or have a superpower.  It's a lot of cheese and meat and bread, and I've only known two people to eat three slices at a go; Mike is 6'3", 300 pounds and a pig; my little brother is a big guy and has an eating superpower when he feels like indulging.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: thedarkestcolors on March 10, 2016, 09:50:36 PM
leak + shrooms + cream (lots) + garlic +  minced meat (makes it better, but isn't nec.) on pasta (the wide and long)

or

white part of mangold + [poop] tons of garlic + lots of cream --> on 1/2 of the rice
green part of mangold in olive oil & salt--> on the other 1/2 of the rice
sometimes I also mix, but usually I prefer them seperated

are usually my lazy dishes.

If I get super lazy its df spinache + some df fish + potatoes/ pasta, but that hardly qualifies as cooking I suppose.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on March 10, 2016, 09:54:08 PM
Interesting.

Sorry about the edit; language.
Title: The Pizza God Way
Post by: Buster's Uncle on March 11, 2016, 02:32:14 AM
I dunno; it's simple, and there's a lot of details, but the simple I already gave is all you really need.

One day in 1988, I was making a pizza from a grocery store pizza kit -box with the crust mix, a can of very good sauce, and an parmesan/romano powdery cheese mix, also pretty good if you grew up on those kit pizzas.  I hadn't done this a million times and as I was pulling bacon, hamburger, sausage and cheddar cheese out to prepare and add -those kit pizzas are more than a little scant with only what's in the kit, but a decent starting point- and I was thinking out loud to myself about how much of everything to add.  My roommate's girlfriend (who was shacked up with us in a one bedroom apartment and not kicking in on rent, and why I swore to never again share a sleeping room with anyone I wasn't intimate with so long as I live) said "Why not more?"

And so I was very generous with adding everything, and it was win, and things ballooned from there, and my social circle ended up acclaiming me the Pizza God a few months later.

It got so I was keeping 11 kinds of cheese in my fridge in my next (much roomier, I had my own bedroom and no 'extra' roommates) apartment, and going through it faster than any of it could get moldy.  The more kinds of cheese, the better the end result tastes - I really don't know why that is.  For two 12" pizzas, or one 16", it cost about 20 1988-89 dollars in ingredients and several hours cooking up the hamburger (five-six patties' worth) sausage (a whole tube) and bacon (1 pound).  And I can give no amounts on the cheese, save that I grated a little each of 11 kinds and got a high-peaking pile that filled a dinner plate.  All that meat cost, but it was the cheese that was dearest.

At those kinds of prices -things like peperoni and green peppers were negligible-  I wanted to get the most food/filling value I could, and couldn't add THAT much sauce, so I went for more, thicker crust, the flour and water being practically free by comparison.  I'd melt a stuck of margarine, and set it aside while I stirred yeast and self-rising flour (I know they're not supposed to play well together, but I got good results) and water together in a big bowl, adding the margarine somewhere in the middle, adding flour and water until I deemed I had enough batter at the right thickness experimentation had taught me worked.  I never had any sort of recipe for that part, and just winged it - and people told me the buttery thick fluffy crust was what really set it apart.  I'd set aside the batter to rise while I worked on the other ingredients.

I liked to set the sauce on simmering low early - canned tomato paste to which I added oregano and the usual pizza suspects (I hadn't discovered sage back then) (I liked to put a little parmesan directly in the sauce).  And the rest was a couple hours of frying pan work and cutting things up.

The assembly and baking of the pizza was almost an anticlimax (pile ingredients away from the center on a really thick pizza, or you'll have trouble removing slices intact before it's cooled) after all the work preparing, and I don't actually remember the baking temperature, except that it was slightly higher than the recommended on the kits I started out with - and it was done when the cheese just began to scorch a little.  Slightly scorched hurts nothing and helps the thick slices stay intact hot out of the oven.  (A trick I worked out was to cook all the meat toppings just a little less than I'd want to eat them at, so's they didn't dry out too much during the baking to cook the crust and melt the cheese - especially the bacon, the last thing to go on top and most exposed/most delicious ingredient you didn't want to cook all the flavor out of in advance, so not quite crispy until the baking.)

Mysteriously, it tastes even better the next day re-warmed in the microwave.  I swear, and why is a complete mystery.  -Why there's leftovers is NOT, provided I didn't have a bunch of people over.  One slice is a lot of food.

My parties -no music, no drinking, no dancing- were VERY popular...

---

Honestly, I'm out of practice and have lost my touch with all the technique I claim isn't important, and the few pizzas I've made in the last decade, not near so divine as I was managing well into the 90s while I stayed in practice.  Doing renfairs on the road, living in a tent, touched the hem of my garment and stole my virtue.  But boy, if you could help me in the kitchen for two or three hours 20 years ago, I could have TAUGHT you something useful.  SHOWN you the bacon-and-cheese-covered light.  Sadly, the student I've worked with most, Momma, has an opposite approach to cooking -and anything she has to do over and over too many times- that she's a corner-cutter, exactly the wrong attitude.  -So, she got the techniques -to the extent she didn't cut THOSE corners over the years- and denies the philosophy.

She is my Peter, crying "I don't know him!" (Her pizza, however, IS generously supplied with mushrooms, Rusty - and mope than middlin' good.)
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on March 11, 2016, 03:21:43 AM
And since someone will ask - cheddar, mozzarella, monterey jack, gouda, provolone, muenster, romano and parmesan are what I remember off the top of my head.

They're all white or orange, and it's not a bad idea at all to segregate colors and do something decorative when applying toppings.  If you have bell peppers gone green yellow and red, likewise for those - I improvised a very pretty one with peppers a roommate chipped in a few years after college.  Also, really delicious with a lot of bell peppers that time...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on March 11, 2016, 03:49:39 AM
I think the reason it tastes better as a leftover has to do with the number and type of cheeses. Your recipe is sort of lasagna-esque.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on March 11, 2016, 03:54:37 AM
I hate  lasagna, and Mom only uses cheddar, mozzarella and parmesan (if she remembers we keep parmesan) and her pizza gets the same effect.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on March 11, 2016, 03:58:10 AM
Edam.  I left out edam cheese.

---

One hopes when I give utter non-recipes, the stories that go with them at least make the ride worth it...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on March 11, 2016, 03:59:57 AM
My bet is it's the sausage.  A lot of my sausage dishes taste better a day later.  To the point I like to make my sausage gravy a day early and reheat it.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on March 11, 2016, 04:04:37 AM
I've frequently suggested making pizza the day before, or at least finishing an hour or two in advance and microwaving - but cursory experimentation tended to indicate the latter didn't help.  I'd wondered if it was the microwave doing it but it seems it's time and/or the fridge.

The former has the problem of a lot of work and it smells so good NOW...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on March 11, 2016, 10:22:11 PM
In an utter coincidence -last time Mom started spaghetti a week or two ago, I mentioned being tired of it and why not pizza- I'm eating some Disciple Peter Pizza at the keyboard.  Momma thinks the second day effect is something to do with being a tomato sauce dish...

Mine in the old days was a lot better, but this is still pretty darn good.

(She forgot she had parmesan on the counter again.  I could make stuff this good up, but don't have to.)
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on March 12, 2016, 04:50:07 AM
Resolved: The next pizza in this house is getting more kinds of cheese added.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on March 21, 2016, 08:34:08 PM
Lazy yesterday, so going to be trying a new means of cooking curry tonight.  (normally I make a day ahead)  It's an idea in my head, not much more than that right now.  Should land somewhere between Korma and Masala. 

Trying to feed the fam tonight and have enough for hEt to eat at work for the rest of the week. 


Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on March 21, 2016, 08:39:06 PM
This is how a good cook learns - taking the risk of trying things.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on March 21, 2016, 11:54:05 PM
I had plans for dinner tonight, to use up some odds and ends. Been a week or so since our last trip to the grocery. I guess I should consider it a complement that the in-laws like my cooking, but it results in a dynamic head count, which tends to go up during the planning and prep phases, the go down by dinner time. Well, I guess there's a family history of shopping around for dinner, because they used to live in a duplex. I hate wasting food. I hate eating all of the leftovers myself. I had to change my plans and go to the store.

Well, it turned out being lazy, I got a shepherd's pie. Someday when my wife is making pie crusts, maybe I can talk her into making one from scratch, so that I can make a shepherd's pie from scratch.
I'm not a fan of the Birdseye frozen mixed vegetables the store  deli uses.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on March 22, 2016, 12:58:36 PM
Should land somewhere between Korma and Masala. 

Decent Korma, actually. 

Same trouble I keep having in the not being able to get the consistency where I like it, though.  I think the new method is promising in that respect, though, just need to refine it a bit. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on March 22, 2016, 01:00:59 PM
Well, it turned out being lazy, I got a shepherd's pie. Someday when my wife is making pie crusts, maybe I can talk her into making one from scratch, so that I can make a shepherd's pie from scratch.


Does not compute...

I've always known shepherds pie to be sans-crust.  Mashed pot over meat/gravy/veggies in a casserole dish.  You seem to be referring to some kind of meat pie/pot pie. 

! No longer available (http://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=99&v=M_GNznvIN1E#)
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on March 22, 2016, 05:35:25 PM
Well, it turned out being lazy, I got a shepherd's pie. Someday when my wife is making pie crusts, maybe I can talk her into making one from scratch, so that I can make a shepherd's pie from scratch.


Does not compute...

I've always known shepherds pie to be sans-crust.  Mashed pot over meat/gravy/veggies in a casserole dish.  You seem to be referring to some kind of meat pie/pot pie. 

! No longer available ([url]http://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=99&v=M_GNznvIN1E#[/url])


Hmm. Apparently you are correct, and that is the standard definition. Must be some local variant or misunderstanding.

Well, that's a hell of a lot quicker and easier than making pastry, but I'd probably call it a "casserole". Or a "hot dish" if it had cheese and bacon on the top...

Again, apparently you're right. Thanks, Uno.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on March 24, 2016, 11:52:25 PM
I grilled ribs for supper yesterday - they're fatty, and not burning them in the grease fire is a challenge.  -A challenge I wasn't entirely up to yesterday.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on March 25, 2016, 06:35:51 PM
Have added "Kung Pao" to the when hEt's working repertoire.  Quick, 20 minute dish I can just whip up.  (time based on everything defrosted) 

Both the boys like it, but it really doesn't taste like Kung Pao. (ingredient list originated from online recipe)  Talia can't get past the peanuts...maybe should try without.

Saute onions and a copious amount of minced garlic in some chili oil, add your chicken and sear.

In a separate bowl add Maggi Seasoning (soy sauce can work), Red Wine (roughly equal to the soy/maggi), brown sugar, and a little corn starch dissolved in water.  Spice with red pepper paste (I just use sriracha instead). 

Add your peanuts and veggies to the chicken, cook until the veggies are tender, then add the sauce and cook until thickened (not long). 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on March 25, 2016, 07:06:08 PM
I just got drafted to make supper.  Probably oven-roast chicken - may make it BBQ, but that's a difference only towards the end of the cook time.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on March 25, 2016, 08:04:45 PM
Thinking it's a pizza night for us.  Got to shop for Talia's Bday and color eggs, little time for cooking. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on March 27, 2016, 02:14:39 AM
Grilled burgers for supper - these were the kind of hamburger that comes in a big tube, which my brother -who has a degree in food science- says contain the most fat they can and still legally claim the be hamburger - so I just threw six patties on w/o any wood or charcoal for extra smoke flavor, figuring the grease fires would take care of that.

I had to take them off before they were cooked through -the patties were thick hand-formed & frozen when I started- before the outsides burned too much, and finish them off in the microwave.  Hit JUST the right balance this time...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on March 27, 2016, 02:51:05 AM
Awesome! I love it when you can pull a rabbit out of your hat!

I was grilling tonight, too. Didn't quite come together for me. 1) I started the chicken when the fire was a little hot. 2) I forgot to start the rice on time.
Also grilled pineapple. Anyway, some of the pineapple got blackened, some of the rice burnt to the bottom of the pan because I forgot to take it off of the heat, and the chicken was a little dry. But, I had some marinade in the bottle in reserve,  and applied that to the chicken, I was able to give myself the blackened pineapple, and I was careful serving the rice. I think the real salvation for the chicken was that this meal was postponed twice due to extra guests and weather. So it had days to marinade.  Still good, but not perfect.

Lessons learned- 1) don't get careless  2) marinade longer  3) cook the pineapple longer at lower heat.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on March 27, 2016, 02:56:32 AM
The last time I threw on some burgers, they came out a little dry -after going to all the trouble with the extra smoke flavoring- and the ribs the time after that just burned on the outside -thank goodness for my BBQ sauce- so yeah; really happy to have something turn out good this time.

I ate all six - nobody else home...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on April 05, 2016, 01:54:00 AM
Tonight's culinary experiment- Shrimp Alfredo

Used Fusilli Pasta, ( couldn't find Rotini the day I shopped. I find rotini to be less mess when eating sauce covered pasta) and 4 cheese Alfredo sauce from a jar. For the shrimp ( peeled, no tails ), I cooked 2 strips of bacon on the crispy side first, removed from the pan, fried the shrimp in the grease, chopped up the bacon to bits, and returned to the shrimp. Drained the pasta, stirred in the sauce. Plated and added the shrimp with bacon bits.

One of the resident women said they could eat this every day. The other would have preferred the addition of garlic and the substitution of Fettuccine. Me, I would have gone with the addition of mushrooms and diced tomatoes, as it was a fairly bland colored dish.

So- pretty tasty, not too complicated or difficult, and there's room for changing protein/seasoning/sauce/pasta for variety.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on April 05, 2016, 02:19:34 AM
Bacon is the ultimate food.  -I'm pretty sure the basic inferiority of Mom's Disciple Peter Pizza is not putting a whole pound of bacon on like I taught her.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on April 05, 2016, 03:49:46 AM
Aha! Yes, it's a great combination of tasty and versatile! It's almost a salt substitute ( I have reservations about using it to bake certain foods ).

That reminds me of a bacon and baby shrimp pizza I used to enjoy. I called it the cholesterol special.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Dio on April 05, 2016, 03:52:37 AM
Bacon is the ultimate food.  -I'm pretty sure the basic inferiority of Mom's Disciple Peter Pizza is not putting a whole pound of bacon on like I taught her.
The ultimate food remains tofu because people can make it into a variety of meat substitutes that have a lower fat and calorie content and a comparable quantity of protein.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on April 05, 2016, 04:09:29 AM
JEsus, are you ever from California.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Dio on April 05, 2016, 04:47:04 AM
Here. I want you to see the delight that exudes from a tofu steak. (http://slapdashmom.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/tofusteak.jpg)
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Dio on April 05, 2016, 04:59:56 AM
I can also enjoy a decently made Falafel ball dish (Crushed, deep-fried or baked, Chick or Fava Beans with seasonings).
(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/05/Falafel_balls.jpg)
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on April 05, 2016, 01:47:46 PM
see the delight that exudes from a tofu steak.
I see burned cheese.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on April 05, 2016, 06:31:57 PM
The trick to cooking tofu is to deep-fry it animal fat, such as beef tallow or bacon grease.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on April 05, 2016, 06:43:05 PM
Doesn't that defeat the whole purpose of pretending it's food?
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on April 05, 2016, 07:21:37 PM
It drives the Tofu people crazy, because it neutralizes the supremacy in the process of making it tasty.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on April 05, 2016, 07:24:04 PM
Food science needs to do a better job - about the only thing they fake well is weak artificial vanilla.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Dio on April 07, 2016, 05:37:21 PM
When I feel lazy, I like to take Tilipia Fillets and cook them in a pan with margarine and a lemon pepper seasoning. I serve the fish with white rice and a vegetable to create a balanced meal.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on April 07, 2016, 05:40:30 PM
JEsus, are you ever definitely from California.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on April 13, 2016, 06:50:26 PM
Been craving red meat for a week now.

This is actually notable, since I also have developed a minor aversion to it.  To the point I'll typically order the chicken at a steak place.  As such, I keep finding excuses NOT to indulge in my craving. 

Thinking...last red meat I've eaten...4/4, we at Freddy's in Flagstaff.

Really want a steak.  Raining, can't grill it myself tonight, so will put craving on hold again..
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on April 13, 2016, 07:24:23 PM
The trick I did with the greasy burgers recently worked Sunday with BBQ ribs - the stuff prone to grease fires and burning makes its own smoke flavor; no need to add wood.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on April 13, 2016, 07:47:39 PM
BBQ ribs

Bones are for decorating not eating. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on April 13, 2016, 07:52:07 PM
We're cheapskates - its actually back/shoulder, with very little bone.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on April 13, 2016, 08:37:33 PM
I read that as "every little bone" and nearly lost my lunch...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on April 13, 2016, 11:25:39 PM
I just had a little steak for supper - no bone at all.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Dio on April 13, 2016, 11:39:32 PM
I just had a little steak for supper - no bone at all.
What have you done to deserve the allocation of expensive food on silver trays?
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on April 14, 2016, 12:17:23 AM
What have you done to deserve the allocation of expensive food on silver trays?
Aluminum.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Dio on April 14, 2016, 12:23:29 AM
What have you done to deserve the allocation of expensive food on silver trays?
Aluminum.
The allocation of that aluminum could have gone towards the production of hats that protect us against the invasion of mind aliens.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on April 14, 2016, 01:42:09 AM
I already had that covered.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on May 13, 2016, 10:57:33 PM
I got drafted for grilling steaks on a half hour's notice.  I'd said something to Momma about she cuts the roasts into steaks kinda thin, and how much easier a thick slice is to get cooked just right, and how it's especially hard to get just right on the grill in the first place - and saw her slicing thicker the other day.

I tried -instead of an uncertain time finishing the steaks off broiling in the oven to preserve some of the juices to cook in and put on the baked potatoes- two minutes in the microwave on a plate.

Best. Ever. maybe.  Definite consensus that it got an A.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on May 14, 2016, 04:22:13 AM
My wife has invited her sister/niece/mother over here for dinner tomorrow night, and informs me I'm grilling. Bear in mind we haven't been grocery shopping since our return. Nothing fresh in the house except for a loaf of bread bought on the way home. There are some potatoes and frozen corn. The head count rules out some of my standard skillet cooked fare for serving everyone at once. Probably have to be something grilled, roasted or slow-cooked.

"What are we having?" I asked, thinking I should probably thaw some meat.

"I don't know yet. I'll have to see what the weather is like."
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Valka on May 14, 2016, 07:24:30 AM
Can't get much lazier than I did today. Late lunch was spicy chili, directly from the can (I hate washing dishes). Supper as I type is bruschetta cheese sticks from Papa John's. I also got a free pizza (I belong to a points program; 25 points = 1 free 14" 3-topping pizza), which means supper was over $20 cheaper than it would otherwise have been. Toppings were spicy Italian sausage, Roma tomatoes, and one of their cheese blends.

Yes, I am lazy. This will do me for meals this weekend.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on May 16, 2016, 06:32:56 PM
I got drafted for grilling hotdogs and hamburgers - and since I was asked at 5:20, I treated it as urgent.  We had company, and it turned out the little spoiled nine year-old step-cousin wasn't being as patient as would have been more than my life was worth at that age.

Once again, letting the burgers make grease fires for 10-15 minutes and finishing off in the microwave yielded superb results, but I still haven't nailed down how to grill dogs without burning them too much; the skins are like chicken for how they want to char.  Now, I grilled dogs for the extended family at Thanksgiving, and a number assured me so I believed them that they like grilled dogs a little burned, but I'd like to get better control of the process and generally be able to cook a dog more evenly and consistently...  There's no upper grill rack in my new grill...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on May 16, 2016, 06:41:34 PM
Did up a London Broil yesterday. 

Red wine, soy sauce, peppercorns, and Marjoram to marinade overnight.  Broil for 7 minutes each side, wrap in tin foil and let rest for 20 minutes before cutting up. (cross grain) 

Easy peasy Sunday dinner with some baked potato side. 

Our grill is a couple years old, and the porcelain grates have worn.  Tried to buy a replacement, which Lowes had this adjustable one size fits all.  It broke in half when I flipped the London broil.  Not happy. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on May 16, 2016, 06:53:02 PM
...Good then, that we decided it wouldn't fit when we tried to get one at Lowes for the last grill...

I thought, when I saw you'd posted, that you'd tell me to put the hotdogs on aluminum foil next time - thanks; I'll try the suggestion you didn't make. :D
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on May 16, 2016, 06:54:15 PM
Hot dogs need a lot of worrying as far as I can tell.  That's why the carousels at the convenience stores do such a good job. 

edit:  Though I see Burger King now sells some.  Knowing Burger King just throws frozen things through the broiler conveyor belt oven, it might be worth trying a BK one to see how well starting with a frozen dog works. 

EditII:  90% of hot dogs make me sick, so my experience is limited.  I have to eat Kosher hot dogs.  Most the time the kids cook their own over the fire pit. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on May 16, 2016, 06:59:56 PM
I don't even like dogs, which is why I've had so little practice; but Thanksgiving was my idea - three packs of dogs are a lot of food for cheap.  I'd definitely like to nail that one down better, 'cause it's a great idea for family gatherings at the Temple of Gramma - and July 4th is coming...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on May 16, 2016, 07:08:40 PM
It's hard to beat boiling dogs for qty. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on May 16, 2016, 08:23:16 PM
Ah, but for summer family stuff you want to grill.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on May 16, 2016, 08:33:49 PM
Charcoal or gas?  I must ask. 


Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on May 16, 2016, 08:36:26 PM
JEsus.  I've talked the whole thread about figuring out how to get flavor using gas.

I wouldn't be this rude to just anyone, but LURK MOAR, young man.  ;) ;lol
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on May 16, 2016, 08:49:48 PM
in one ear out the other. 

I have both, and technique would be quite different between them.

Even the lowest setting on gas is too much for dogs without constant attention, and that's where your biggest problem lies

Putting tinfoil on top of the grill would just simulate working on a frying pan, and wont help a ton aside from preventing grease fires/flares. 

What COULD work is to lay your foil over your deflectors, to act as a second deflector.  (I've done this for fish, so the idea is sound)

So, you'd have Grate: --------------------
Tinfoil shiny down:     _______________
Deflectors:                 ^         ^         ^
Burners:                     I          I          I

This evens out the heat distribution, eliminates hot spots, and lowers the overall temp at the grate. 

This is a generally bad setup for steaks or burgers, though, so you'd need to adjust for the dogs.  A good thermometer on your lid will help too.  You might need to puncture some holes in the tinfoil if you don't get up to 300. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on May 16, 2016, 09:10:22 PM
...I will try some things as I come across dog practice opportunities in the future.

I did, in fact, throw 'em on and close the lid yesterday - at Thanksgiving, I fussed, and they took too long and burned a bit too much anyway.  -And it was cold and nobody kept me company.

Ground beef, I've found, makes plenty of grease if you've got a good sense of the timing -I throw it on frozen and give the patties ten minutes to cook good on one side with the lid closed so they'll stay intact- and I dunno; when there's room, I think I'll try the ribs rack for the dogs.  The extra few inches elevation might do the trick.  There wasn't room yesterday.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on May 17, 2016, 09:33:36 PM
Got a hankerin for some homemade Kung pao tonight.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Oerdin on May 20, 2016, 07:47:36 PM
Beef bourguignon is my go to comfort food mostly because it tastes good and is easy to make.  Once the prep work is done it is mostly just simmering and letting the flavors marry.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on May 20, 2016, 07:51:44 PM
Beef bourguignon is my go to comfort food mostly because it tastes good and is easy to make.  Once the prep work is done it is mostly just simmering and letting the flavors marry.

Hm.  Red meat, but looks like one I could stomach.  In general, I need to learn French cooking.  You have a particular recipe you follow?
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on May 20, 2016, 07:56:38 PM
Briefly, how do you make it?

(PLEASE get an avatar or ask me for something...)
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on May 20, 2016, 08:03:22 PM
Had a particularly successful experiment go off last night.

I dubbed it Kung Pao Enchilada Curry as a laugh, because it had a mix of methods. 

We had a fridge full of leftovers for the weekend.  (hEt works this weekend, so I have all meals made ahead of time both for her 'lunch' and our dinner), so didn't want the leftovers we normally would have when making Curry.  THE PLAN for MONDAY was an off the shelf Indian simmer sauce.  When I got home, though, I discovered our sauces had all expired, so I figured what the hell, I'll make my own simmer sauce. 

Using the lessons I'd learned from making homemade enchilada sauce, I used the same method but with Indian spices to make a thick and rich tomato based sauce. 

Well, then the sister in law ruined dinner Monday, so I set that sauce aside till yesterday.  (this sitting probably helped)

As the sauce was reheating, I cooked the chicken as I do when making Kung Pao: sautee in chili oil and copious amounts of garlic. 

Diced that and added it to the sauce for a curry-ish dish the family loved.  Much quicker than making proper curry. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on May 20, 2016, 08:57:10 PM
That reminds me...

Orange sauce for your stir fry?  Frozen orange juice - a few spoonfuls melted on the hot food.  It's that simple, assuming you were adding soy sauce anyway.  Delicious.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Oerdin on May 21, 2016, 10:40:08 AM
Beef bourguignon is my go to comfort food mostly because it tastes good and is easy to make.  Once the prep work is done it is mostly just simmering and letting the flavors marry.


Hm.  Red meat, but looks like one I could stomach.  In general, I need to learn French cooking.  You have a particular recipe you follow?


It is basically just a beef stew so there are dozens of recipes but they are all the same minus a few minor changes.  This one looks good or if you are feeling ambitious go with the classic Julia Childs recipe your granny probably used to make in the 1950's.

http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/boeuf-bourguignon-104754 (http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/boeuf-bourguignon-104754)

Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Oerdin on May 21, 2016, 10:42:21 AM
Briefly, how do you make it?

(PLEASE get an avatar or ask me for something...)

I will have to dig up my old panda Avatar.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on May 21, 2016, 01:21:38 PM
I think I talked about how I make beef stew in this thread - I was doing all the cooking for a few months recently when Mom racked up her right shoulder - and my wimminz were loving my beef stew - and so was I.

Funny as it is with you being a drone until your next post and having one like a tiny avatar, I'll hook you up and you can change it at will.  Your sig link meets with official encouragement.  ;b;  -During the run-up to BE, I encouraged Nik and Lori to link their respective BEs; you might want might want to specifically siglink your 6, you being the person working hardest at the folder so far (good on ya for that).  -It's part of living the mutual support I believe in; we're all in this together, ultimately.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on May 21, 2016, 01:48:47 PM
Done.  I do wish you would wear about anything else, that grudge being so ancient it has moss growing on its moss, and here being a bunch that swore off perversions with a certain Chinese animal...

-When I saw you in this thread yesterday, I was all "Oh, right; he's a big foodie.  Should have thought of that".
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on May 21, 2016, 09:12:33 PM
I've gotten drafted grilling BBQ ribs for supper and will have to get on that shortly.  Still waking up from the nap 45 minutes later - sometimes you're super sleepy and able to go right to sleep and it's still low-quality and you wake up tired, if not sleepy anymore.  So not eager for this, but not something I need to be real sharp for.  Looks like it's trying to work up a thunderstorm out side, but unlikely to be a problem except for Mom getting tense.  I can just move onto the carport anytime.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Oerdin on May 21, 2016, 09:59:59 PM
If you are going to do ribs then you need to get a smoker,  dude.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on May 21, 2016, 11:05:55 PM
"Country" ribs - they're actually some sort of back cut, not actual ribs - there's bits of either shoulder blade or pelvis when there's any bone, the former, I think.

I've been working on my technique for about a year, if you want to read the whole thread -my BBQ sauce recipe tops page two and it's genuinely good- and you did just try to tell a North Carolinian how to barbeque...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on May 21, 2016, 11:46:28 PM
BYW - I was going to give this latest effort a B, but Momma said it was at least a B+.  I can't really taste the smoke flavor for a few hours after I grill - leftover bits always taste markedly better to me later if it was good.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on May 22, 2016, 01:46:54 AM
And I left out that it did rain - but started just before I moved the grill into the open, so no problem.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Oerdin on May 23, 2016, 10:31:04 AM
Tonight was pasta puttanesca with garlic bread and a caprese salad.   It was a lot of cheese but good and there are plenty of left overs.   Served with a rather subpar Sangiovese; it was on sale.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on May 23, 2016, 02:42:22 PM
That's more up my alley.  In fact Caprese salad is one of the biggest reasons I like to grow my own tomatoes.  I wouldn't bother right now, since the store tomatoes are awful. 

Not a fan of anchovies for "proper" puttanesca, but otherwise most my pasta sauces come out similar to it. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Oerdin on May 23, 2016, 09:44:58 PM
I like anchovies in pasta sauce as they melt into the sauce,  add a nice flavor,  and bump up the protein content without people even knowing it.  I also make my ceasar salads the traditional way with anchovies.

The ingredient I have been getting into lately is Asian fish sauce which is about the closest thing we still have to ancient Roman garum.   It goes especially well in soups or broths adding flavor while bumping up protein content and mouth feel.

Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on May 24, 2016, 02:23:58 AM
Anchovies you're eating the bones which is just not happening with me.  Won't eat bone in steak, and forget about gnawing meat off a bone either.  It's a stupid mental block from butchering our own food growing up, but one I can't shake. 

Fish sauce, I can get into, but haven't found a good one yet, outside the local pho place. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on May 24, 2016, 03:30:57 AM
Well, it is what it is. I think the bone-in culinary trend is over-rated.  Yes, the bone imparts more flavor, but it also serves as a heat sink, and most likely results in uneven cooking. Not what I want from my steak. Neither do I want extra work or waste eating it.

I gladly pay for the butcher to debone a ham. Yeah, a bone has merit when making soup from scratch. Or liverwurst/scrapple. Those are  the best uses for them. But in my case, marrow means excess salt, so I avoid it. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Oerdin on May 24, 2016, 05:17:12 PM
They do sell anchovy fillets which are bone free.   Like unorthodoxed I also like pho.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on May 24, 2016, 06:43:57 PM
They do sell anchovy fillets which are bone free.   

I've never seen the like here in the desert.  Admittedly, I've never looked all that hard either. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on May 24, 2016, 07:43:50 PM
They do sell anchovy fillets which are bone free.   Like unorthodoxed I also like pho.

I like both, but there are salt restrictions to consider.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on May 24, 2016, 08:20:11 PM
I'm doing Chicken Racku for supper tonight, I'm told.

I should take a picture of the rack with the drumsticks hanging from it on the grill and post later - what the heck.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Oerdin on May 24, 2016, 10:55:57 PM
They do sell anchovy fillets which are bone free.   

I've never seen the like here in the desert.  Admittedly, I've never looked all that hard either.

They sell them every where.   Even Walmart and Target have them.

On topic: Yesterday was left over pasta whole today I am feeling lazy and will likely just pick up a roast chicken from Costco.   A 4lbs chicken for $5 sounds lile the right price.   Cooked and ready to go.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on May 24, 2016, 11:32:24 PM
As good a batch of Chicken Racku as I've ever made, roughly equal to my roasted chicken, if not to a good panfull of fried.

(http://alphacentauri2.info/MGalleryItem.php?id=1123)

I've been getting very consistent results and less over/undercooking with a variety of meats grilling about 3/4 done and finishing off in the microwave.  Not cleaning out the ashes accumulated in the bottom as an aid to grease-dripping-produced smoke is yielding excellent results for sufficient smoke flavor with gas, and much better control w/ less wood and charcoal added for flavor.  -This was all stuff that didn't catch in the front left over from my last grilling.

Time to trim my mustache, though - the BBQ sauce was wanting to build up in it.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Oerdin on May 26, 2016, 12:10:50 AM
So far today I have only had a cheese quesadilla which I made using the microwave because I was in a hurry.   The proper way is to cook it in a pan so the tortilla gets toasted and not soggy as happens in the microwave.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on May 26, 2016, 12:47:29 AM
Sloppy Joes tonight.  Alec made them.  We'll see how well he did, but it smells spot on (not easy for me to eat red meat at all anyway).

Recipe is from gramma's neighbor and dates back to the 40s at least. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Oerdin on May 26, 2016, 02:47:15 AM
Sloppy Joes are perfect for little kids to learn to cook because the directions are easy,  presentation is simply slopping them on a bun,  and it is near impossible to get it wrong.   So they figure out cooking is both fun and easy.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Dale on May 26, 2016, 03:10:40 AM
Spag Bol and stir fry is also great for kids.  Fry the onion, brown the meat, add the sauce and vegies then simmer.

My eldest made our spag bol last night and it was great.  I usually teach the kids stir fries at scouts as it's a hearty one pan dinner.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on May 26, 2016, 01:49:40 PM
The Sloppy Joes were pretty solid.  We do them in the crock pot and cook over 8 hours.  Usually mix the night before and just take it out of the fridge and turn on the crock the next day.   

I try to have the kids cook once a week so they'll have some basics down when they leave the house.  Kyle (17) is learning finesse cooking, gravies, how to tell when meat is done, stuff recipes don't teach you.  Alec (13) is learning to follow recipes.  Talia (9) is learning how to turn on the oven/microwave and read instructions on premade stuff like chicken nuggets. 

They also do their own laundry from the time they can reach.  Equal parts mean, lazy and good parenting as far as I'm concerned. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on May 26, 2016, 03:18:03 PM
;b;  Those are all non-optional life skills, if you ask me.  Make 'em all learn how to thread a needle and stich a few stitches, too.

I had to teach Mylochka how to make gravy when she was 50.  I was appalled.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Oerdin on May 26, 2016, 05:18:03 PM
I am guessing,  from her name, that she is from Russia so they may have a different culinary tradition which doesn't use gravy so it is perhaphs understandable that she was unfamiliar with it.  Just my thoughts.

Oh,  both yesterday and today will be left overs days.   I need to use some of the left overs up before I make more.   Waste not,  want not,  and all that.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on May 26, 2016, 05:25:50 PM
Naw, that's a username - my sister, and a bubba like me - just didn't learn as much "girl chore" skills from Momma as Buster's Daddy and I did.

(-Not actually like me, though; she's Dr. Mylochka, and that's The Reverend Dr. Buster's Daddy these last six months...)
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Oerdin on May 29, 2016, 04:40:22 PM
I just made a breakfast burrito.   Scrambled eggs,  sausage,  diced onion,  pan fried potatos,  and diced tomato all topped with Sriracha &  cheese then wrapped in a flour tortilla.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on May 29, 2016, 04:53:50 PM
I did breakfast burritos for dinner last week. 

Steaks on tap for tonight.  I'll post up my grilled potatoes as well. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on May 29, 2016, 04:55:14 PM
I did Chicken Raku for supper again yesterday - was going to fry chicken, but we half-expected some family over, and they don't make frying pans big enough.  Ended up they didn't show, and we only ate half the Raku, but that's not a bad thing...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on May 30, 2016, 02:43:30 AM
dox family spiced potatoes.  Used camping, stovetop, grilled, whatever. 

Canned "new potatoes" chopped.  I just buy the diced now.  Garlic powder, salt (kosher), pepper (seasoned pepper), and onions (fresh or dried).  1 TBL butter per can

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-EcuWI0QJO9g/V0t1llrnvtI/AAAAAAAAgnA/UB_43Jwuj_wUCx0KH2PPhYAWvyQWINOLQCCo/s800/IMG_1225.JPG)

Camping/grill:  put it all in tin foil and roll all seems together.  Cook on low heat 30 minutes.  (charcoal, shoot for indirect heat, rake the coals away)

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-3Smcl-sE8_g/V0t1mtOdzxI/AAAAAAAAgnA/6tOgmnlyVaMT3yizuxbM98gDJ6ayEKEagCCo/s800/IMG_1226.JPG)

Stovetop: covered frying pan on medium heat 20 minutes. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on May 31, 2016, 02:15:13 PM
Alright, it's grilling season, and with the house being torn apart, I'm looking at plenty of it over the summer (winter for Dale). 

So, let me hear about your burger secrets. 

First, IMO, there's two ways people try to make a good burger.  Fixins or mixins. 

Fixin wise, the most Utah thing out there is:

Blue Bacon Burger:  Utah original (fairly well documented), though some national chains are making poor knockoffs lately.  Basic burger patty, thick bacon, swiss cheese, lettuce, tomato and Blue cheese dressing. 

Mount Ogden Burger:  The other claimed Utah original, seen it much more widely across the country, Patty, ham, swiss, lettuce, tomato, "Fry Sauce" (this is a totally Utah thing, but thousand island dressing is a common substitute) 

It's the mixins I'm more interested in. 

A little history with me:

We were dirt poor, and mom approached burgers as an economic way of feeding the family.  Anything that would extend that meat was fair game.  Thus, for most my childhood burgers were closer to meatloaf.  Always a package of lipton onion soup mix was going to be in.  Most common other items to mix into the burger were zucchini and carrots.  Oats, bread crumbs, etc were never unheard of.  Add an egg or two if they don't want to stay stuck together. 

By comparison, the prepacked patties they now use are tasteless. 

About 20 years ago, I found a pile of recipes in my grandma's trash bin.  Among these is a depression era recipe for hamburgers, and it's become the basis of my own tinkering since.  Though, I've yet to take it all the way to it's ultimate step. 

It goes thus: 

The recipe calls for getting castoffs from the butcher, with certain cuts to look for to run through your meat grinder.  Jumping it into today, you want equal parts ground sirloin and ground chuck.  This yields a fairly lean burger. 

Mix that together, and smash it all as flat as you can make it.  To this, you're going to add your spices.  Now the recipe gets lost here with pieces impossible to reproduce ('grandpa's mustard' and 'moms chili paste' are just nowhere to be found).  But the gist of it still lives. 

Make a paste out of liquid and dry spices.

Last night, I used Dijon mustard with a bit of soy sauce and Cholula hot sauce mixed with garlic salt, pepper, minced onions, and thyme. 

Anyway, spread the paste evenly across your flattened ground beef.  Roll it up into a loaf, and knead it until mixed.  Spread flat and repeat. 

Make your patties.  This is where I break from the recipe, make thick burgers and grill. 

The recipe calls for thin patties.  WHICH YOU THEN ROLL IN PEANUTS and fry.  (Peanuts at the time of the great depression were extremely economical and would have been a great way to extend your meat)  One of these days I'll work up the courage to try the peanuts, but I don't know how that'll fair on the grill, and I don't care for fried burgers much. 

Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on May 31, 2016, 02:32:53 PM
A big thick patty is easier to cook just so than a thin/small one, as is generally true of meats.  If I'm forming the patties myself, I go for covering my whole palm and try to make the edges slightly thicker than the middle to work against the tendency of ground beef to contract into a sphere as it cooks.  My patties are a bit labor-intensive getting those edges smoothed, but the end-product is better.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Dale on May 31, 2016, 06:53:13 PM
Burgers, no idea.  Wife makes ours and they are fantastic.

I just cook 'em and eat 'em.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on May 31, 2016, 07:33:48 PM
Here the popular high end grocery store premixed options are blue cheese of some kind,
 bacon cheddar, mushroom swiss, or tailgate burger which usually is something like bacon/cheddar/Jim Beam barbecue sauce. Although being Wisconsin, other kinds of cheese are fair game for burgers, too.

We tend to mix and match when we buy those. .

I've gotta figure something out for dinner tonight...I feel a mixed grill in the near future.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on May 31, 2016, 07:49:55 PM
Momma used to mix in so much oatmeal and ketchup into the burger meat when I was a kid the grease would stain the bread orange w/o anything else on it yet - then she figured out it wasn't the great depression anymore, and it's pure ground beef, now.  I wish I could get her to add a pinch of salt, actually.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on May 31, 2016, 11:19:54 PM
omelettes tonight cause I'm feeling lazy. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on June 02, 2016, 04:33:34 AM
Grilled bratwurst for supper because Momma told me to.

-Not hard to screw up, grilling bratwurst, but they don't burn like hotdogs and you just have to cook them low and turn them every five minute or so, and listen for any grease fire getting too big.  They might have done better if they'd thawed longer before.  Finished them off in the microwave as is becoming standard.  Delicious.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on June 02, 2016, 04:38:33 AM
Hot Dogs over firepit.

Making a new crockpot curry attempt for tomorrow
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on June 02, 2016, 06:24:00 AM
Why is it that it rains when I want to light the fire, and rains again when it's time to put the food on?
OH YEAH! Because I grill with charcoal.

I did a mixed grill tonight, some of it was cleaning out/making space in the refrigerator or freezer.
2 Filet Mignon Terriyaki, 2 Chicken breast cuts marinated in Ginger/sesame salad dressing, 2 chicken patties in pineapple/bourbon sauce, a mushroom/swiss burger, two cheeseburgers and two brats. got rid of 3 open bottles.

The mushroom/swiss and the steaks came out a little under done, but I loved the burger that way, and it allows the steak margin for reheating. The rest of it I got perfect. Looking forward to lunching on leftovers  tomorrow.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Dale on June 02, 2016, 11:47:47 AM
Honey soy chicken sticks and mash.  Sauce was out of a bottle but all the rest hand done.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on June 02, 2016, 08:36:18 PM
My wife finished off the salad lettuce before I could make a steak salad. SO I went with the cheeseburger on a pretzel roll and topped it with some cocktail sauce. I'm a horse radish fan. It clears the sinuses.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on June 02, 2016, 09:28:44 PM
Momma was going to fry burgers for lunch, so it wasn't taking a bullet to volunteer to grill them instead and have them good.  I'm in serious danger of getting the burger grilling down to where it's just 20 minutes low effort and pretty dependable.

However, towards the end I commented through the kitchen door that I wasn't getting quite as much grease fire flareups as I'd hoped, and she laughingly apologized for buying better quality ground beef lately.  -It's true that the cheap fatty stuff in tubes grills better...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on June 02, 2016, 09:39:18 PM
Momma was going to fry burgers for lunch, so it wasn't taking a bullet to volunteer to grill them instead and have them good.  I'm in serious danger of getting the burger grilling down to where it's just 20 minutes low effort and pretty dependable.

However, towards the end I commented through the kitchen door that I wasn't getting quite as much grease fire flareups as I'd hoped, and she laughingly apologized for buying better quality ground beef lately.  -It's true that the cheap fatty stuff in tubes grills better...

The one I posted above does 1/2 and 1/2 with the fatty/lean, and works pretty well.  I don't get the out of control fires, but you still see flare-ups. 

I also have some premade frozen hockey puck things to toss on for the kids when hEt is working.  I tend to do those like I'm back at BK.  High and fast, and they come out just about the same as BK...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Dale on June 02, 2016, 10:44:28 PM
Momma was going to fry burgers for lunch, so it wasn't taking a bullet to volunteer to grill them instead and have them good.  I'm in serious danger of getting the burger grilling down to where it's just 20 minutes low effort and pretty dependable.

However, towards the end I commented through the kitchen door that I wasn't getting quite as much grease fire flareups as I'd hoped, and she laughingly apologized for buying better quality ground beef lately.  -It's true that the cheap fatty stuff in tubes grills better...

What sort of bbq? Gas or char?
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on June 02, 2016, 10:49:36 PM
Gas, but I have tricks to make smoke flavor...

You joined here years ago, or I'd give you a big LURK MOAR N00B! for that...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Dale on June 02, 2016, 10:58:33 PM
Wood and char is best of course. Oh and try a drip cup. It slowly drips fat to cause flare ups.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on June 02, 2016, 11:06:21 PM
Wood works, but is hard to control the fire.  I've been having better luck with little or no wood -lots of wood ashes left in the bottom, though- but a few bricks of charcoal and letting the grease in what I'm cooking do the job.  The grease wasn't cutting it at first with a clean bottom when the grill was new in December, but the ashes absorbing and retaining what grease doesn't burn instantly seems to make the difference...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Spacy on June 02, 2016, 11:17:41 PM
Was told I am to make burgers. 

Picked up a new spice packet - weber brand "KC BBQ" to add to the meat.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on June 03, 2016, 12:34:29 AM
...See my BBQ sauce recipe top of page two when you have time for it done North Carolina right...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Spacy on June 03, 2016, 12:53:55 AM
Lots of sugar in the spice.  Otherwise, mild but good flavor.  Would recommend as a dry rub on ribs if you like them a bit sweet. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on June 03, 2016, 01:15:40 AM
...I don't go for things hot-spicy, but I've found that in BBQ, a drop of tabasco doesn't hurt and always helps...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on June 03, 2016, 03:15:37 AM
Try Cholula.  Really.  It's actually less spicy than tabasco so should be more up your alley. 


The crockpot curry was pretty darn good.  Bottle of spice from a local Indian place, amount listed on label, tomato sauce, and cream of chicken soup, cook all day.  Easy peasy. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on June 03, 2016, 03:33:31 AM
Never heard of Cholula - I'll pass that along to Momma to look out for, though; I don't mind a touch of heat to the BBQ, but her stomach's turned against it.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Dale on June 03, 2016, 05:59:32 AM
Fish n chip Friday tonight. We hold to certain ways from the Motherland. :)
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on June 03, 2016, 06:39:04 AM
Fish n chip Friday tonight. We hold to certain ways from the Motherland. :)

Hey, wait! I thought you caught fish, but didn't personally eat them.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Dale on June 03, 2016, 08:18:14 AM
Flake isn't really fish. ;)

I usually get a burger with the lot.   :o
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on June 03, 2016, 01:46:49 PM
Never heard of Cholula - I'll pass that along to Momma to look out for, though; I don't mind a touch of heat to the BBQ, but her stomach's turned against it.

That's right, you're east now.  Cholula is an actual Mexican import making it's way east slowly.  Figured you would have seen it in Texas. 

If you've ever tried Tapatio, it tastes about the same but with the consistency of Tabasco. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on June 03, 2016, 02:10:18 PM
I'm not real, what you'd call, open-minded about Mexican spices -and my snap reaction when a native of the godless wastes we stole from Mexico suggested something I'd never heard of was that it was that- the whole cuisine is really hit-and-miss for me.  So, it not having come on my radar yet doesn't mean much.

Momma likes the idea -she loves my sauce, just not the getting sick- I'm certainly willing to try it out and today's grocery day...  The local groceries have well-stocked latin food aisles since we started getting central American immigrants around here in the 9os, and Momma shops them already for the good deals on cheeses and beans and whatnot; cholula might just turn up...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on June 03, 2016, 07:52:50 PM
I don't stomach pepper and onion juice very well. Using them as vegetables doesn't work for me, using dried ones as seasoning does. Or if it's slow cooked for a long time, like an onion soup or a chilli, then I can probably eat it. Tobasco is tasty, but exceeds my salt restrictions.

So, I'm not big on the cuisine if I can't pick the peppers and onions out, and even then there may be too much juice left in the rest of the dish.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on June 03, 2016, 08:51:52 PM
I like those things one heck of a lot better than I used to...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on June 04, 2016, 03:56:03 AM
Try Cholula.  Really.  It's actually less spicy than tabasco so should be more up your alley.
Momma brought a bottle home.  We haven't tried it yet, but it has a cute bulbous wooden lid, and we'll be keeping the bottle one way or another...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on June 04, 2016, 04:36:19 AM
They do make neat potion bottles. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on June 05, 2016, 03:10:13 AM
My wife's all time favorite appetizer at our favorite dining establishment was a coffee-barbecue chicken flatbread. The chef has changed several times since, but I have the recipe. Trouble with it is, it's so complicated to make the bread from scratch, let it raise, etc, make the sauce, and the pesto stuff, fresh garnish, etc. It's like making Thanksgiving dinner. A lot of time consuming work.

So we experiment with shortcuts. We tried a frozen organic chicken barbecue flatbread in the pizza-oven, and added some grated apples to the top after it was cooked. It was a success.

Not a coffee barbecue sauce, but we have a frozen cheese flatbread to experiment with. Maybe Monday.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on June 05, 2016, 03:45:14 AM
Interesting art on the bottle, for a Catholic country.

(https://i.warosu.org/data/ck/img/0052/59/1394327714743.jpg)
Embiggen that.  It's a saint - it's a housewife making salad.  It's a housewife making salad who happens to look like the Blessed Madonna with Her halo.  -Subliminal much?

Pretty much opposite of the disco treats, that's for sure.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on June 05, 2016, 04:59:10 AM
Stapled.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on June 05, 2016, 06:47:05 AM
Pretty sure she's making the sauce, not salad. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on June 08, 2016, 02:09:53 AM
I've been about cleaning out odds and ends ever since that mixed grill last week. Not necessarily lazy, other than I suppose the alternative is to make dedicated dishes with fewer servings, something along the lines of more involved lunches.

Anyway, today's offering was a pork roast cooked atop a some halved red potatoes, some peeled & sliced carrots, and a peeled & sliced parsnip. Included was a stick of butter, some onion soup, and some chicken broth. A little bit of mixed garlic/pepper/citrus/onion powder on the roast. Well received.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Dale on June 08, 2016, 02:06:01 PM
Made butter chicken tonight and just finished a batch of eclairs and cream puffs.

Sitting in front of the fire having an eclair and coffee while watching Nashville season 3.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on June 08, 2016, 03:20:07 PM
Made butter chicken tonight

As in indian? 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Spacy on June 08, 2016, 11:21:42 PM
Looks yummy!
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Dale on June 08, 2016, 11:56:15 PM
Made butter chicken tonight

As in indian?

Yeah, Indian butter chicken.  I missed getting a photo of it.  Got devoured pretty fast by the ravenous vultures we call kids.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on June 09, 2016, 12:39:20 AM
I got appointed to grill steak on short notice.  It was just grilled steak -nothing on it- but excellent.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on June 09, 2016, 01:51:00 AM
Made butter chicken tonight

As in indian?

Yeah, Indian butter chicken.  I missed getting a photo of it.  Got devoured pretty fast by the ravenous vultures we call kids.

Got a recipe for that one?
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Dale on June 09, 2016, 10:41:41 AM
Made butter chicken tonight

As in indian?

Yeah, Indian butter chicken.  I missed getting a photo of it.  Got devoured pretty fast by the ravenous vultures we call kids.

Got a recipe for that one?

Sorry, the sauce was Aldi brand. I just browned the chicken, made rice and poured it from the bottle.

Dunno how to make the sauce by hand.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on June 09, 2016, 01:33:25 PM
Dunno how to make the sauce by hand.

You should try it once, not terribly difficult. 

Simple method: Sautee onions and shallots in butter, add the chicken and garam masala (spice) and fry, add some tomato sauce.  (you'll probably need salt too)

Longhand method:  Sautee onions and shallots in butter, add tomatoes and garam masala and cook down to a paste.  Add chicken and fry.  Add water, coconut milk, yogurt, or cream to the dish to get the sauce the consistency you want. 

The TRICK is either making or finding a good garam masala. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Dale on June 09, 2016, 09:14:31 PM
Dunno how to make the sauce by hand.

You should try it once, not terribly difficult. 

Simple method: Sautee onions and shallots in butter, add the chicken and garam masala (spice) and fry, add some tomato sauce.  (you'll probably need salt too)

Longhand method:  Sautee onions and shallots in butter, add tomatoes and garam masala and cook down to a paste.  Add chicken and fry.  Add water, coconut milk, yogurt, or cream to the dish to get the sauce the consistency you want. 

The TRICK is either making or finding a good garam masala.

Thanks Uno, I'll have to give this one a try!  Have you tried adding a bit of natural yoghurt, as we normally add it to the kid's plates to calm it down for them?

BTW, does the sauce keep all right?  We have lots of afternoon things on (Scouts, sport, working late some days) and our preference is to use bottles simply because of speed.  Spag bol sauce can go in the freezer of course, I assume this can too?

Yesterday I was working from home (benefit of being a programmer) and made a traditional lamb roast.  Some nights, specially in winter, it's great just to gorge out on a bit chunk of roast.  :)
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on June 09, 2016, 09:42:57 PM
Dunno how to make the sauce by hand.

You should try it once, not terribly difficult. 

Simple method: Sautee onions and shallots in butter, add the chicken and garam masala (spice) and fry, add some tomato sauce.  (you'll probably need salt too)

Longhand method:  Sautee onions and shallots in butter, add tomatoes and garam masala and cook down to a paste.  Add chicken and fry.  Add water, coconut milk, yogurt, or cream to the dish to get the sauce the consistency you want. 

The TRICK is either making or finding a good garam masala.

Thanks Uno, I'll have to give this one a try!  Have you tried adding a bit of natural yoghurt, as we normally add it to the kid's plates to calm it down for them?

BTW, does the sauce keep all right?  We have lots of afternoon things on (Scouts, sport, working late some days) and our preference is to use bottles simply because of speed.  Spag bol sauce can go in the freezer of course, I assume this can too?

It SHOULD. 

When I cook that, it's specifically NOT to have leftovers.

Our home life, we have essentially 3 kinds of dinners. 

1:  hEt home, and I need to make enough so she has 'lunch' for work (she works graves). 
2:  hEt home, don't need/want leftovers.
3:  hEt working, just me and the kids. 


Butter Chicken falls into category 2.

However, I do make a crockpot curry and a tikka masala for category 1 (If I was going to be canning this year, I'd probably look into canning some tikka masala sauce just to have the bottled convenience, myself) , and I usually make enough to freeze a batch for a later date, so I would think butter chicken would fall into that category as well, I just don't have the pan to fry that much chicken at a time.  Only thing that might happen is some butter separate in the sauce.  Nothing a stovetop reheat (as opposed to microwave) wouldn't cure. 


Basically, I need to cook 3-4 "real" meals a week, one of which will need leftovers.  The other 3-4 days, it's me and the kids (half the time not Kyle), which tends to be making them cook, off the cuff, or prepacked.  I've often said I don't know how other married folk stay together having to see each other EVERY DAY... 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Dale on June 09, 2016, 11:24:31 PM
Sounds like you guys operate similar to us.  We have the following types of days:

- All of us get home around 6pm and need something quick to cook.
- I work from home, and some of us have evening stuff on, so something filling that's quick to eat.
- I work from home, and we all have a big sit down dinner.
- Weekends (work it out on the day).
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on July 15, 2016, 10:22:46 PM
Uno, I do believe the Cholula has worked out pretty well for the hot-sauce element in my BBQ sauce, and thanks for that.

I had to make up a new batch of BBQ sauce over the weekend, deviating from the recipe topping page two significantly because we were almost out of smoke flavor and Worcestershire.  -But the former is somewhat redundant on grilled meat, and the latter doesn't add much the constituent sauces I use as base don't also have, besides the vinegary tang - I went heavy on lemon juice to compensate, and found the results better than I'd hoped.

When someone has made a grocery run -that's probably me driving, tomorrow- and stocked back up on supplies, I hope to make a new on-model batch while there's plenty of the lemony batch left for taste comparison...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on July 16, 2016, 12:05:14 AM
Grocery shopping got postponed yesterday, and I ended up doing a mixed grill. I do charcoal. The problem was that when it came time to relight, we got about a 25mph wind. Went out a couple of times, I tried putting the lid on early to prevent sparks ( it hasn't rained, and the grass is dry ), but it couldn't get enough air that way. Ended up babysitting it and multitasking with watering the lawn.

There was a point to this anecdote.... So I put the food on, and the wind makes one side a blow torch and the other cool. I tried to do my best with turning flipping, and re-arranging. Charred the salmon skin, but otherwise it was great, blackened one side of some brats, got a cheeseburger well done... and the chicken breast my wife requested turned out perfect. Well, I'd rather be lucky than good.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on July 16, 2016, 12:21:17 AM
I'd rather be good than lucky, which is lucky I feel that way, never being lucky and all.  -Good, I can generally do something about.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on July 18, 2016, 03:34:27 PM
Glad you liked the Cholula. 

Figured a decent time to repost this, as it's the plan tonight. 

Uno's Fajitas:

Dice up ye chicken
Slice up ye bell peppers and onions
add celery salt, olive oil (so it don't stick to pan) and cholula (Or hot sauce of your choosing, prefer cholula for this.  Omit the olive oil if using the grilling basket on the grill)

Optional garnish:  Sliced tomatoes, cover with basil, salt, garlic and onion.  Sautee in olive oil. 

Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on July 18, 2016, 03:42:16 PM
Mylochka would like that a lot - I may pitch it to Maw...

Wikipedia had claimed cholula was a lot hotter than you did, but direct tasting indicates you had it right - I've found I need to be less careful to not overdo it.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on July 18, 2016, 03:58:38 PM
Mylochka would like that a lot - I may pitch it to Maw...

Wikipedia had claimed cholula was a lot hotter than you did, but direct tasting indicates you had it right - I've found I need to be less careful to not overdo it.

Huh.  Not sue why Wikipedia would quote some random dude's blog as opposed to the manufacturer. 

I will say I've noticed Cholula ramps up CONSIDERABLY in the presence of regular pepper.  There's some kind of symbiotic heat going on.  If I give a decent dose of pepper from a grinder along with the Cholula, it can get spicy.  (working on a quick and dirty Chinese-ish chicken utilizing this)


Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on July 18, 2016, 05:35:26 PM
Hmm.  I don't think I put any black pepper in the last batch...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on July 19, 2016, 10:06:12 PM
Corn just come into season, grabbing some corn on the cobb to eat alongside baked potato bar. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on July 29, 2016, 07:57:30 PM
I did a beef roast in the oven, along with heirloom carrots and red potatoes. Forgot to season it, and ended up putting some Merlot -infused salt on it. The orange carrots stayed orange and the yellow ones went white. The red potatoes faded ,too, so not so picturesque. What was really remarkable was the tenderness. I cooked it for about 4 hours instead of the usual 2+ to 3 hours. It remained moist because I threw in a box of broth and a stick of butter. So maybe it was essentially a slow cooker thing done on a larger scale in the oven. Just had some of it again for lunch.

Next time I make it  I'll focus more on the low and slow aspect and the seasoning rather than a colorful presentation.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on July 29, 2016, 08:00:46 PM
I've had some similar experiences with low slow baking, beef roast in particular...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on August 01, 2016, 09:51:17 PM
Time to break it off and go grill a batch of Chicken Racku for supper - back in an hour or two...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Bearu on October 06, 2016, 04:17:30 AM
I plan to prepare a beef Solyanka over the weekend. The best analogy of the dish remains a warm beef stew with a tomato and beef broth base. The beef version of the dish often includes several varieties of meat like ham, sausage, and a beef roast with onions, olives, salt, pepper, capers, and pickles. The dish remains served with the eastern European version of sour cream, dill, and lemon slices.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on November 06, 2016, 09:19:18 PM
Bump.  It was on page two, Rusty, near the top...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on November 06, 2016, 11:02:23 PM
Bump.  It was on page two, Rusty, near the top...
Thanks!

I went through 5 pages of titles twice and STILL couldn't see it.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: ColdWizard on November 07, 2016, 12:28:59 AM
ctrl-f
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on January 11, 2017, 12:01:05 AM
Yesterday offered a reprieve from the winter winds, so I grilled some marinated chicken, and made enough extra for my wife to have a couple times on her lunch salad. after I took the chicken off, I tossed a few frozen burgers on the low fire while I ate, to absorb some flavor.

Today I made chilli with that grilled burger meat, and used some v8 juice in place of water. A great success.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Elok on January 11, 2017, 03:29:59 PM
Many months of experimentation with mac and cheese have led me to a new sauce.  I make a standard roux (equal parts flour and butter, generally 2-3 tbsp of each per cup of milk), stirring in the milk very gradually so the roux absorbs it properly.  Cook until it thickens properly at moderate heat.  Add powdered garlic, white pepper, nutmeg, salt, and a little bit of red pepper flakes.  Then some shredded mozz and parmesan.  Be careful how much mozz you add, since it adds a LOT of gooeyness to the sauce.  Finally, chuck in some chopped frozen spinach and cook till it's thawed and mixed in.  Works well with radiatore pasta, since the thick sauce coats all the folds and they catch the spinach.

Somebody just gave me some nice Swiss the other day, so I'm going to experiment with that.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on January 11, 2017, 05:57:39 PM
Nutmeg?
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on January 11, 2017, 06:24:04 PM
He's trying to get high.  Elok's a nut-head...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Elok on January 12, 2017, 02:52:19 AM
Nutmeg is a traditional booster for white cheese sauces, esp. Swiss.  My sauce works okay with Swiss, except the cheese doesn't really melt properly so you have lots of little semisolid lumps.  I know it can be done; it might involve using different kinds of Swiss or perhaps grating it finer.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on January 12, 2017, 05:21:18 AM
Nutmeg is a traditional booster for white cheese sauces, esp. Swiss.  My sauce works okay with Swiss, except the cheese doesn't really melt properly so you have lots of little semisolid lumps.  I know it can be done; it might involve using different kinds of Swiss or perhaps grating it finer.

Thanks, I had no idea. The only cooking applications I could of think for nutmeg were pumpkin pie, egg nog, and a Painkiller cocktail.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on January 12, 2017, 02:24:36 PM
Nutmeg is a traditional booster for white cheese sauces, esp. Swiss.  My sauce works okay with Swiss, except the cheese doesn't really melt properly so you have lots of little semisolid lumps.  I know it can be done; it might involve using different kinds of Swiss or perhaps grating it finer.

I'd actually suggest more milk. 

Thanks, I had no idea. The only cooking applications I could of think for nutmeg were pumpkin pie, egg nog, and a Painkiller cocktail.

I don't know why nutmeg and allspice have kinda gone out of style in American cooking, but looking over my grandma's old recipes, they were both used quite a bit in a rather large variety of dishes as of the 30's. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Elok on January 14, 2017, 02:27:39 AM
I'm still mastering the subtle alchemy of the cream sauce.  Different cheeses have wildly different outcomes in sauce.  Shaker parmesan seems to disappear.  Cheddar is straightforward.  Jack adds little flavor but some gooeyness.  Shredded mozzarella is immensely gooey and doesn't incorporate fully; it forms a peculiar sort of matrix within the sauce.  And now Swiss.

(For mac and cheese of the conventional type, I highly recommend a mix of smoked cheddar, sharp conventional cheddar, and jack for goo.  Small traces of mustard and even curry powder boost flavor)
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on February 11, 2017, 01:57:56 AM
When I roast a piece of meat or a bird, I first cover the bottom of the roasting pan with carrots &/or potatoes, add some broth and butter, that way the protein doesn't burn/stick to the bottom of the pan, although I suppose I could let it do that and deglaze with some wine. Anyway, my household loves the slow roasted carrots.

The last two beef roasts I froze the excess broth. Today I used it to make a soup. I added barley, mushrooms, a little leftover beef and vegetables from the last roast ( cut into small pieces ) and seasoned it with something called "better than bouillon". I really enjoyed it. Better than I expected. Since I made it with mushrooms, me and the dog will have it all to ourselves. Onions would be an easy substitute.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on March 16, 2017, 01:44:30 AM
Been frustrated with the disaster going on at work, and the shop's not in order right now/can't be for a little while yet,thus halloween is off the table, so have been experimenting in the kitchen. 

Tonight was braised chicken and fettuccini (spelling) alfredo.  Neither of which I've ever done before and had no recipe for, just trying new things. 

The braised chicken yielded the most perfect stock I've ever tasted, and the alfredo is do die for. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Spacy on March 17, 2017, 10:08:04 PM
Congrats.  Our new kitchen is going in slow - hoping to get counters in next week, then sink, backsplash and little bits of odds and ends and then done. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on August 27, 2017, 05:59:05 AM
Beef and chicken bullion are not an optional cooking supply, and not expensive or any trouble to add.  Many boiled dishes can benefit, including vegetables.

My brother discovered that trick about 25 years ago - I kept wondering why the green beans he was boiling smelled so good.  This one is especially essential for bachelors and college kids and the like, who don't spend a lot of money or effort on cooking at home - also nutriments added to pastas..

I got my mother doing this with the noodles in the stroganoff, and it improved the quality dramatically (cooking the noodles together with the meat/gray on low for an hour or two is also key fir more than one reason).

Also?  Sometimes you just crave a quick microwave soup at night (or for someone sick) w/o fooling with opening a can.  This is cheaper, too.  -I totally kept bullion on hand in my renfair camping days, when I was living on not much more than peanut butter sandwiches
   

This has proved to be good advice, although I like a paste product in a jar called "Better than Bullion" instead of beef bullion.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Geo on August 27, 2017, 10:01:18 AM
Congrats.  Our new kitchen is going in slow - hoping to get counters in next week, then sink, backsplash and little bits of odds and ends and then done.

Congrats on becoming an adult. ;)
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on August 27, 2017, 08:00:15 PM
I tried to make another reply late last night, but our guest cat leapt upon my keyboard and crashed everything. I re-read the thread, except for a couple off topic tangents. It's a good thread, and spans more time than I realized. I sensed a couple of themes. Buncle is often called upon to grill dinner on short notice. I am often called upon to accommodate a fluid head count the day of, while my meal planning and shopping is based upon a weekly approach for two or three people.

I used to be a gas griller, but my wife's family are strictly charcoal, and I live in their state now. So I learned to cope with longer prep times and struggling against adverse weather, but not usually happily. By the time I finished the thread and all the accounts of Buncle being asked to grill on short notice, I've concluded that I am no longer envious of his gas grill.  Best post before the cat strikes yet again.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on August 27, 2017, 08:14:00 PM
Thing is, I like meat, I like it grilled and smokey, and I don't need much notice with the gas grill, combined with the ashes-and-charcoal-in-the-bottom technique I've successfully worked out and talked about repeatedly for smoke flavor.  -And I'm doing part of my duty by my momma, doing my fair share of the cooking.

The only downside is having to sit outside for extended spells in dicey weather sometimes.  -But the cats come hang around, the weather is frequently awesome, and most things only take fifteen minutes on the grill and a few finishing off laying in their own juices in the microwave.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on August 27, 2017, 08:45:43 PM

I recommend that everybody who's serious about being lazy and/or impatient in the kitchen get a pressure cooker.  My wife got one called "Instant Pot" (it's Japanese or something and does not, to my knowledge, involve marijuana) off Amazon; it's a pressure cooker, slow cooker, and plain ol' ordinary cooker all in one.  You can set it to sautee and fry onions in this thing, and since it's heating from every direction but up it cooks onions, bacon and the like quite fast.

Excellent advice! My wife got me one for Christmas. It's a perfect fit for the Lazy Gourmet Philosophy. Mine would be newer and possibly has more features. It also has a rice cooker, and Soup setting. ( the thing is computerized with a touchpad and display ).

So recently I was trying to figure out how to free some refrigerator and freezer space.

I had most of a box of chicken broth left over from making rice, some crisp bacon and tomato slices leftover from making BLTs, some diced tomato from when we had tacos, an unopened  can of V-8 juice left over from the last time I made chilli, and a handful of old frozen shrimp from the last time I made Alfredo. I decided to make a Jambalaya.

 I put in the broth & V8 and added a cup of rice. Cut up the other stuff and added it. Got a chicken breast and a handful of breakfast sausage links from my freezer, partially thawed them, then cut those up and put them in. For seasoning I tried a teaspoon each of onion powder, garlic pepper, smoked paprika, and red pepper flakes. Normal people would add salt, too. Locked the pot, closed the valve, and hit the soup button. Turned out great! Well, a little too much red pepper overshadowed the other flavors, but my head was congested and the improvised Jambalaya opened it up. I'll cut back on the cayenne next time and adjust seasoning to taste after it's cooked. It's not that it was too hot, it's that it was almost masking the other flavors.

A purist might have added onion, okra, and file, but the whole point of this venture was to remove odds and ends from my cold storage, not make a trip to the store for more food.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on August 28, 2017, 04:20:57 PM
So, life has changed at our place since I last posted here.

Kyle's got a job with the local UPS facility, swing shift.  So, he's NEVER home for dinner now. 

With hEt also gone 3-5 nights of the week, it's myself, Alec, and Talia for dinner, with the caveat I need to make enough for hEt and Kyle to have lunches, so things that reheat well, occasionally even undercooking stuff specifically to allow it to finish on reheat. 

Dinner has become this weird mix of whatever I feel like attempting that day, but the go-to is getting some fresh tomatoes and vegetables on the way home, and making a sauce to go over something.  Sometimes as a side, sometimes the main.  I'm surprised just how many flavors you can get from some tomatoes, veggies, and my herb garden. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on August 28, 2017, 04:28:20 PM
Do any of the kids cook worth anything?  If not, why aren't you teaching them?
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on August 28, 2017, 06:29:14 PM
Kyle can follow a recipe, but dislikes cooking.

Alec is Sous-Chef, and could make a decent chef.  I'm teaching him a little more advanced stuff on his fundamentals.  I wouldn't be shocked if he decided this as a career path.  He is regularly cooking part of a meal at my side with little supervision.  Occasionally will cook a whole meal with only taste checks from me. 

Talia is Prep-Chef, learning to chop and measure, as well as simple box meals for herself. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on August 29, 2017, 01:32:21 AM
Tonight, fresh corn.
Tuesday- Pork and candied apples.
Wednesday- Guests. The plan is grilled cheese sandwhiches, and I'm going to see if I can do a Bacon/Cheddar/Corn/Potato chowder in the Instapot.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on August 29, 2017, 02:43:36 AM
Tonight, fresh corn.

The corn here has been HORRIBLE this year. 

I mean, I'm picky, having grown up picking it fresh from a field, but local corn has typically been above average to occasionally good.  This year it's just plain awful.  Everyone seems to have planted varieties for higher yields but they taste like crap.

There's a local produce stand that's been in business since I was working on the farm.  I stopped by and asked him why he didn't even have any corn, and he said the same thing.  He won't pay for that crap. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on August 29, 2017, 03:05:45 AM
Our corn is delicious, but it was late becoming available. It must have been too cold/wet for planting this spring. I processed and froze one bushel, I'm thinking about doing another the end of this week.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on August 29, 2017, 01:22:30 PM
Our corn is delicious, but it was late becoming available. It must have been too cold/wet for planting this spring. I processed and froze one bushel, I'm thinking about doing another the end of this week.

I didn't pay much attention this spring since the bush pumpkins didn't need planting until mid to late June.  (though now knowing they'll set pumpkins in 100 degree temps, you COULD wait till mid July!)  It may have been the early sweet corns didn't take due to the spring.  They are the varieties I prefer, and the later corns typically suck. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on August 31, 2017, 04:22:43 AM
Wednesday- Guests. The plan is grilled cheese sandwhiches, and I'm going to see if I can do a Bacon/Cheddar/Corn/Potato chowder in the Instapot.

It worked well. The soup was a hit

Tenative plans

Thursday- dining out
Friday- Mixed grill, which will include a pork chop, and pineapple for dessert.  Not sure yet what else, I've got chicken, steak, burgers and brats in the freezer... maybe some other stuff. There's halibut. I think I'll grill some fingerling potatoes, too.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on August 31, 2017, 04:47:50 AM
I grilled steak for supper - and salmon in some marinade for Mylochka, who's been on a diet and not eating with us for months.  -Just flamed 'em on somewhat-high until they were only slightly under done, to finish off in the microwave, as always.  Delicious.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on August 31, 2017, 05:32:26 AM
I grilled steak for supper - and salmon in some marinade for Mylochka, who's been on a diet and not eating with us for months.  -Just flamed 'em on somewhat-high until they were only slightly under done, to finish off in the microwave, as always.  Delicious.

It does sound delicious. I'm out of salmon, and I'm supposed to eat it a few times a week. Well, I do have some in cans, so I am eating it one way or another, but I've got no salmon steaks or salmon filets, and haven't grilled any all summer, now that I think about it.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on August 31, 2017, 01:25:26 PM
Steak Au Poivre.  Because I wanted to attempt it. 

Alec made the fettuccine alfredo as a side. 

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/sIKSxNVfa-qlXWGaL6BA5y4iiRqYn42uATLRhi-RBtUpzcNGzULwmoZLbq8I4yYasbMSLlxwujqWScooiiSZEvvow-BNSFcBwcs6niGDwC4Izp3qgFSQVzx_B4WUMbsm4ABGiirUPdgn1-KSnVJO87EIpm07_mdSLs6AbH7mmyUzDTLbH0LPrvFx2FOQummCSv749CucPnekkW4AQHyuTAsvwau21QrjaZrw_ndWBhrLOnHuL6MSzdAgTG7QQBjCXTKpj2wdC2c140G5qq_8e1fIVYX8hxe0dX2ZfLanlmdVabXuPzXwyCa0VkN4WYMliMzLz3vCq26Jy3dW6tNdpuM9vAXh8Q5UZCrwobQ2hSQOYIBcSoS9Ha_tY7JegfcFuKHUa2a1-aMGyV7j-Vcsr7QNrp5RQ4GPvaDjxAcP8Cy_6366VXU-cHdD1_4EGE41UxJx53B1tuNgHIxI70gY8WuOxGlsAk690niz84XDkQH0sEijaAKVfh9G4_chb1Zm5px8taPCAPwIl3A5OUiMhuctP6cIc8h8FvllhtyaQ-zb0PnF1ksQVoXOHTTeCkzBXAhtit9guHtoc7CplEM3EcrnUhW1l0R_M1vnk1y_o_U_rtGBbvy0vQ=w1215-h911-no)
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on September 02, 2017, 08:24:17 PM
The steak looks delicious.

I had the last of my soup today, still delicious.  I'm trying to decide whether to buy/process/freeze corn now, or wait till after the holiday.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on September 04, 2017, 01:06:50 AM
Well, no corn freezing this weekend. The person who I normally deal with at the farmer's stand was off, and the sub wouldn't sell me any substantial quantity. I should have planned ahead, but it's not a special weekend for us, so I don't think of it as a holiday.

Had leftovers yesterday, and mixed grill today. Supposed to be the wife and I plus 2, but had a no-show. I grilled 3 chicken filets, 2 beef filets, a boneless pork chop, a pineapple and some fingerling potatoes. I was pleased with the potatoes being basically mini baked potatoes, but next time I'll start them before the meat.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on September 04, 2017, 08:50:43 PM
Found a bunch of round steaks on the discount/day old bin for $1/lb. 

Marinated and made fajitas. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on September 04, 2017, 08:53:13 PM
Well, no corn freezing this weekend. The person who I normally deal with at the farmer's stand was off, and the sub wouldn't sell me any substantial quantity. I should have planned ahead, but it's not a special weekend for us, so I don't think of it as a holiday.

Had leftovers yesterday, and mixed grill today. Supposed to be the wife and I plus 2, but had a no-show. I grilled 3 chicken filets, 2 beef filets, a boneless pork chop, a pineapple and some fingerling potatoes. I was pleased with the potatoes being basically mini baked potatoes, but next time I'll start them before the meat.
Forgetting the name, but came across a french method of cooking those 'new' potatoes/baby potatoes.  You fry them in butter and seasoning just enough to get the outside a little crust, then finish in the oven.  They are fantastic. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on September 04, 2017, 10:36:08 PM
Thanks, Uno, I'll have to try that!
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on October 05, 2017, 07:14:35 PM
Having leftovers for lunch.

Made Hyderabadi biryani the other night on a whim. 

Well, technically I cheated as I just used our rice cooker instead of a proper dum cooking.  Whole meal in the rice cooker worked rather well. 

It is seriously my favorite of the Indian dishes I've learned to cook.  (unfortunately most the family prefers my Masala and curry.) 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Spacy on October 06, 2017, 11:11:10 PM
Congrats.  Our new kitchen is going in slow - hoping to get counters in next week, then sink, backsplash and little bits of odds and ends and then done.

Congrats on becoming an adult. ;)

:D

Unfortunately, been there a bit too long now it feels like. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Elok on November 09, 2017, 01:40:21 AM
This thread has surprising legs.  Anyway, the other night we had a hunk of boneless pork and no notion what to do with it.  Out with the pressure cooker!  I browned the pork, fried up a bunch of onions, and for lack of a better idea stewed both with apple slices and a bunch of baking spices: cinnamon, nutmeg, and cloves, plus a bit of brown sugar.  Pork goes with apples.  Apples go with apple pie spices.  Friends of friends, right?  It didn't turn out great, but mostly because I added salt before cooking down the sauce, and then the wife compensated by adding more apples to soak up the salt, and added some more sugar while she was at it.  It wound up tasting just a liiiiittle too sweet.  We'll do things differently next time.  Apple pork, I believe in your potential.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on November 09, 2017, 01:44:26 AM
That sounds promising once you get the proportions worked out - bbq and a lot of Chinese sauces are pretty sweet, and I love those.  You probably want to move away from all the baking/dessert spices, though, and think like you're spicing meat...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on November 09, 2017, 02:39:18 AM
I was thinking ditch the onions...

 It's good that we bring different palates to the table.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Elok on November 09, 2017, 02:40:39 AM
No, actually, the cinnamon worked out pretty well.  Ever hear of Sauerbraten?  It's full of goofy stuff that sounds like it belongs in a bakery, and it's delicious.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on November 09, 2017, 04:08:02 AM
The onions could easily be overdone, according to my palate, Rusty...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on November 09, 2017, 09:00:30 PM
Been feeling like crap since Halloween. 

Made biscuits and gravy as something of a comfort food last night. 

Man everyone else's sausage gravy is so bland...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Elok on November 10, 2017, 01:37:58 AM
I might note that the carnitas we just had involved oranges and lemons, as well as the more buttoned-down and predictable ancho pepper and tomatillos.  There's a place for the unexpectedly sweet in meat.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on November 24, 2017, 05:50:09 AM
I was going to make a seafood bisque in my Instapot, but since my mother hinted I was getting an immersion blender for Christmas, I think I'll wait for it to arrive before I do that.

I've been contemplating a sort of "COSTCO soup". Five cheese tortolinis,  tomato-pepper broth, & chicken, to simulate the chicken parmesan flavor profile. Perhaps some diced tomatoes. Serve it with some grated parmesan and some croutons on top.

How does that sound to you guys?
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Geo on November 24, 2017, 09:09:26 AM
How does that sound to you guys?

Cheesed out? ;)

Personally, I'd just go pick up a 'four cheeses' pizza. Then again, I mosttimes only cook for myself, so...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on November 24, 2017, 03:36:29 PM
This is Wisconsin. Cheese goes without saying. Burgers means cheeseburgers.

I often joke that dairy-free meals are against state law.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on December 08, 2017, 07:42:12 AM
I was reading some soup recipes on Pinterest. Turns out tomato cheese tortolini soup is a thing. You add it to the soup at the end and cook on high for 15 minutes. I'm going back and forth on the chicken, considering alternative meats. Sometimes I think tomato/cheese/ham is a better flavor profile. Perhaps some Parma ham or Canadian bacon. Or tomato/cheese/hamburger.  My wife just informed me she won't be eating it regardless. Not the soup enthusiast my family is. Doesn't like tomato based ones anyway. My niece would enjoy it. I could freeze some for my parents.

Tonight was Pork Parmesan and corn. Head count was 2 plus 2. Not a problem because I figured a 50% chance of plus 1 when I was preping.

Sunday's plan is burgers on the grill for 3. We have some preformed patties left. The nice part about them is you can tell the relative degree of doneness by the diameter shrinkage. Also, you can sandwhich some cheese beween two of them before cooking and then mash the edges together to make a bigger, tastier burger.




Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: E_T on December 10, 2017, 01:54:14 AM
Been feeling like crap since Halloween. 

Made biscuits and gravy as something of a comfort food last night. 

Man everyone else's sausage gravy is so bland...

If my ex was still alive, he would be really digging this thread (as well as contributing to it.

UnO, he used to make B & G for dinner all the time and I think that it's just how the gravy is derived from the Sausage Fat, but then, I was the one whom ate the stuff he made and he always kidded that I could burn water (only IF I tried...  :D ).
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on December 10, 2017, 11:56:54 PM

If my ex was still alive

Not sure I knew that.  My condolences. 


The secret to sausage gravy lies entirely with the sausage, it's true. 

I use a rather spicy sausage that's actually rather lean.  Then deglaze the pan with a bit of merlot, melt a stick of butter into it and make a roux, then add the milk. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: E_T on December 11, 2017, 06:59:41 PM
You likely have heard this, but to give a bit of background...

My Ex and I were together for 8 1/2 years.  We broke up a month before the Hurricanes had come through Central Florida in 2004.  We still had some connection, due to the fact that we had, what we liked to call "A Jeff Foxworthy type relationship" (you know your a redneck when.... :D ).  My Brother is married to his Sister and their Daughter is both of our's Niece.  I was instrumental in my Brother meeting his wife and they were instrumental in me meeting my Ex.  He passed on New Year's Day, 2010, from Congestive Heart Failure.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on January 03, 2018, 02:00:11 AM
That tomato tortellini soup thing was a bust. The flavor profile was fine, but trying to cook everything together made it more of a pasta & sauce dish than a soup. I added more broth, but it just sponged it up.  I think it could be great assembled in the bowl like a lobster bisque, but lazy it ain't.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on January 03, 2018, 03:32:51 AM
That tomato tortellini soup thing was a bust. The flavor profile was fine, but trying to cook everything together made it more of a pasta & sauce dish than a soup. I added more broth, but it just sponged it up.  I think it could be great assembled in the bowl like a lobster bisque, but lazy it ain't.

I don't know if I've posted here previously about my 'crock pot lasagna' that kind of takes advantage of this.  You get the sausage and tomato sauce in the crock all day, then 30 minutes before eating, dump in the cheeses.  15 minutes before eating, you dump in pasta and some water (I actually prefer to use the shells for this) 

The shells soak up a good portion of the mixture.  If you let it sit too long, though, the shells will soak it all up and you get a kind of mush.  Tastes fine, but mush. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on January 03, 2018, 03:35:53 AM
I'm still mastering the subtle alchemy of the cream sauce.  Different cheeses have wildly different outcomes in sauce.  Shaker parmesan seems to disappear.  Cheddar is straightforward.  Jack adds little flavor but some gooeyness.  Shredded mozzarella is immensely gooey and doesn't incorporate fully; it forms a peculiar sort of matrix within the sauce.  And now Swiss.

(For mac and cheese of the conventional type, I highly recommend a mix of smoked cheddar, sharp conventional cheddar, and jack for goo.  Small traces of mustard and even curry powder boost flavor)

I totally forgot about this and only recently made a mac and cheese for the first time.  Mine was Parmesean, Asiago and White Cheddar with just a touch of smoked cheddar for color and flavor. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on January 03, 2018, 05:45:50 AM
That tomato tortellini soup thing was a bust. The flavor profile was fine, but trying to cook everything together made it more of a pasta & sauce dish than a soup. I added more broth, but it just sponged it up.  I think it could be great assembled in the bowl like a lobster bisque, but lazy it ain't.

I don't know if I've posted here previously about my 'crock pot lasagna' that kind of takes advantage of this.  You get the sausage and tomato sauce in the crock all day, then 30 minutes before eating, dump in the cheeses.  15 minutes before eating, you dump in pasta and some water (I actually prefer to use the shells for this) 

The shells soak up a good portion of the mixture.  If you let it sit too long, though, the shells will soak it all up and you get a kind of mush.  Tastes fine, but mush.

Thanks. It's good to know that it's the nature of the beast. I know little of Italian cooking. Not exactly cultural for me. I think my closest Italian relative is my cousin-once removed's wife.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on January 03, 2018, 12:37:20 PM
When I was out of work and had little to do other than cook and garden, I did a hell of a lot of messing with tomato dishes, thus italian. 

The grocer typically has some noodles in the fridge section.  They are a lot easier to cook, and won't suck up quite as much liquid.  This can be good or bad depending on what your recipe needs. 

But for the tortellini soup specifically, I'd suggest pan frying the tortellini first. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on January 03, 2018, 10:01:16 PM


But for the tortellini soup specifically, I'd suggest pan frying the tortellini first.

Thanks, it sounds worth a try next time.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on January 09, 2018, 02:28:58 PM
Recent favorite is a very unorthodox Shakshouka.

It's a single skillet meal, so you need a big enough pan for who you're feeding.  I dice and begin to fry up bacon (and all the purists cry in outrage, very much NOT in recipes for the dish) and/or sausage, once it's browned but not fully fried, I add a healthy dose of onions and peppers to it, and get a good carmelization on all of that.  Then spice it all up with cumin and curry powder, add enough tomato sauce (fresh tomatoes if in season, then cook and crush it to a sauce) to cover the mixture in the bottom and salt to taste. 

Then you crack eggs on top and cover them till the eggs are poached.  Serve with a good crusty bread. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on January 15, 2018, 04:48:25 AM
Dinner tonight was marinated grilled chicken, rice, and grilled pineapple with sauce. My wife made some corn muffins.

I grilled extra chicken (seasoned, not marinaded ) and made a jambalaya to finish a holiday ham, and some surplus tomatoes from when my wife made tacos last night. Other proteins were baby shrimp, breakfast sausage, and bacon. Not necessarily lazy, but fairly efficient to prep the soup while waiting for the charcoal to burn down to cooking coals. I wanted to do this while the kitchen was still a mess. The Mrs. likes the kitchen to stay clean for a while once it's been properly cleaned.

I think I'm going to make a Jaeger Schnitzel next Sunday. Not exactly lazy, but I plan to take the lazy approach and use a store jar gravy & serve it in a gravy boat, instead of making a pork roast first and saving the juices. The Mrs. is mildly allergic to mushrooms, so I'm planning to do them as a side dish for myself rather than incorporating them into the gravy. If I fry the cutlets with a couple shallots, some butter and a little garlic, then deglaze the pan with white wine or sherry, she'll be happy to have that jus all to herself, and figure she got the better bargain.

She says her mother would prefer Spatzle ( I'll get that from the store, too. ) , and we'll go with glazed carrots as the vegetable.

Now I want to buy some Spaten to go with it.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on January 16, 2018, 07:14:59 PM
You've had tortellini stuck in my head since that above, so going to try something tonight.  Haven't decided if I'm doing a carbonara sauce, or something of a tomato basil yet
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on January 17, 2018, 03:50:37 PM
I don't know how to call it.  hEt and I liked it (hEt LOVED it), Alec (never had stuffed pasta before) and Talia (thinks Chef Boyardee mini raviolis are the best) tolerated it. 

Pan seared sausage.  Added onions and bell peppers to sautee in the grease.  Removed that mixture and added the tortellini with a little olive oil to pan fry, just a quick browning on each side.  Added about 1 1/2 cup of water with a minor deglazing of the pan and a good bit of basil, and covered that for about 2 minutes to ensure the rest of the pasta that hadn't hit the pan got cooked.  (I considered using a wine, but wasn't sure how the pasta would cook with just wine.) 

Added the meat mix back in with a can of tomato sauce (soup can) and sliced grape tomatoes.  (they didn't have the brand tomatoes I normally use and these were rather meh, unfortunately)  Unfortunately, had to transfer to a bigger pan, so my whole one pan idea got ruined.  Stirring that in, it barely coated everything.  Added salt to taste and enough cream to just get a bit of sauciness. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on January 17, 2018, 07:25:01 PM
I don't know how to call it.  hEt and I liked it (hEt LOVED it), Alec (never had stuffed pasta before) and Talia (thinks Chef Boyardee mini raviolis are the best) tolerated it. 

Pan seared sausage.  Added onions and bell peppers to sautee in the grease.  Removed that mixture and added the tortellini with a little olive oil to pan fry, just a quick browning on each side.  Added about 1 1/2 cup of water with a minor deglazing of the pan and a good bit of basil, and covered that for about 2 minutes to ensure the rest of the pasta that hadn't hit the pan got cooked.  (I considered using a wine, but wasn't sure how the pasta would cook with just wine.) 

Added the meat mix back in with a can of tomato sauce (soup can) and sliced grape tomatoes.  (they didn't have the brand tomatoes I normally use and these were rather meh, unfortunately)  Unfortunately, had to transfer to a bigger pan, so my whole one pan idea got ruined.  Stirring that in, it barely coated everything.  Added salt to taste and enough cream to just get a bit of sauciness.


 That sounds good to me.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on January 18, 2018, 05:20:07 PM
The laziest of gourmets:

Alec made us egg in a hole last night. 

Talia is making pancakes tonight. 

Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on January 22, 2018, 02:24:43 AM


I think I'm going to make a Jaeger Schnitzel next Sunday. Not exactly lazy, but I plan to take the lazy approach and use a store jar gravy & serve it in a gravy boat, instead of making a pork roast first and saving the juices. The Mrs. is mildly allergic to mushrooms, so I'm planning to do them as a side dish for myself rather than incorporating them into the gravy. If I fry the cutlets with a couple shallots, some butter and a little garlic, then deglaze the pan with white wine or sherry, she'll be happy to have that jus all to herself, and figure she got the better bargain.

She says her mother would prefer Spatzle ( I'll get that from the store, too. ) , and we'll go with glazed carrots as the vegetable.

Now I want to buy some Spaten to go with it.

It worked out pretty well, although there was a lot to do at once, and it used a lot of pans and burners. Not lazy. The Mrs. prefers pork parmesan because she likes cheese & more garlic. Still, she enjoyed the fried shallots and having the jus all to herself. She liked the carrots, even though I couldn't find her recipe. She offered to make them next time. I think that means if I prep the carrots and clean the sink afterwards. My MiL enjoyed eating German for a change. Next time I'll buy the mushrooms close to when I make the food, rather than when I'm close to where I can buy good mushrooms.

It's good to drink Spaten again.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on January 22, 2018, 02:35:57 PM
hEt hates mushrooms, so I don't get to play with them nearly as often as I'd like 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on February 04, 2018, 12:34:33 AM
Far from lazy, made homemade meatballs for tomorrow.  First time ever trying that, but damn did they turn out good. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on March 09, 2018, 06:54:26 PM
Started a new diet yesterday. So, if I stay on it I may not have much to offer to this thread in the future. On the other hand, my wife wouldn't take to this diet. So I'll still be cooking regular stuff. If I find something special I'll let you know.

Last night was a mixed grill. My wife had chicken, steak, and some steak fries. I cut a potato lengthwise into six pieces, then sprinkled them with my go to Montreal seasoning. Grilled them and gave them a coupled minutes in the microwave while the steak rested.  She loved it. I figure whatever seasoning blend you favor would work best.

I had grilled green beens and grilled tuna.

I grilled extra chicken and steak for use in salads..
I'm finishing a bed of spinach with steak, and a litttle oive oil and basil.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on March 09, 2018, 07:12:11 PM
Momma, of late and in a spontaneous development in which I take delight, has been occasionally cutting up 'taters into strips and frying instead of her traditional lame waste of 'tater trying to bake french fries.

This is anti-diet, mind, 'cause I gots the scarey-high triglicerides - but I can't help that my occasional craving for french fries has been sated lately, and being happy about it anyway.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on March 09, 2018, 09:08:10 PM
My diet at this stage basically excludes sugars, starches, and anything sweet. But my plan is to not bother anyone with the details unless and until I get and sustain results. In the long run my previous lifestyle averages a pound gain each month. I've made up my mind to change that. If this doesn't work, I'll try something else.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on March 09, 2018, 09:11:28 PM
I don't know that you shouldn't talk about it, at least as regards your cooking...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on March 09, 2018, 11:58:19 PM
I’ve been on a new diet since being in the ER 2 weeks ago.  (We don’t know still other than not heart, liver, or diabetes, meaning likely gall bladder)

Fairly radical departure from my previous daily on one hand but easy so far with the exception of cold turkey soda withdrawal.  Immediate thoughts of “success” for weight seem to even out the second week.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on March 10, 2018, 12:19:54 AM
If the soda you're not drinking had caffeine in it, that's not going to help the diet at all...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on March 10, 2018, 12:39:18 AM
Caffeine is amongst the things my body doesn't metabolize normal, so it doesn't act as a stimulant in me like most people, it works as a depressant.  (some of the go to sleep drugs being others.  Real funny to see the doctors confused why I'm not asleep) 


It's the sugars in soda that were killing me.  Coupled with increased stress at work and another year working on the house and not Halloween meant I had been diving pretty damn hard into the soda as a coping mechanism.  1/2 case + a day, hard to get exact measurements as I'm a fountain snob.  I wasn't particular caffeine vs non a lot of the time either, though Dr Pepper had been the go-to. 

The leaving work for breakfast and lunch to sit and eat and drink just to get away from people also didn't help. 

I've got that worked for another few weeks since I'm 80% of the time alone, again, but I'll be back co-bunked with dumbass after that.  That's when my willpower to not go find somewhere to sit and eat again will be tested. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on March 10, 2018, 02:11:58 AM
Okay this counts as lazy gourmet, I was supposed to be dining out tonight but life doesn't read plans very well-

I sautéed some spinach with almonds and portobella mushrooms. Placed the grilled chicken on top. Looked great, tasted great, had a nice mix of textures. The particular piece of chicken was a little dry because I over multitasked last night, but the spinach moisture made up for it. I probably should have photographed it.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Geo on March 10, 2018, 07:35:46 AM
Momma, of late and in a spontaneous development in which I take delight, has been occasionally cutting up 'taters into strips and frying instead of her traditional lame waste of 'tater trying to bake french fries.

This is anti-diet, mind, 'cause I gots the scarey-high triglicerides - but I can't help that my occasional craving for french fries has been sated lately, and being happy about it anyway.

French fries... baked?! :o ;q;
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on March 10, 2018, 01:58:08 PM
I know, right?
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Geo on March 10, 2018, 02:14:42 PM
How can she not realize the... abomination... of that??! :o

Day-old baked potatoes, all you want, but fries? baked?  ;no

(no offense to your significant parent who managed to let me eat well)
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on March 10, 2018, 02:40:58 PM
She doesn't realize.

-I do tell her to be genuinely flattered that her biscuits were good enough for a Euro.  One imagines that you were surprised to find an American making good bread.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Geo on March 10, 2018, 04:58:46 PM
I was. :D
Of course, she's from an earlier generation that still knew how to eat well. ;b;
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on March 10, 2018, 10:38:10 PM
I can actually make a decent biscuit - though you were the beneficiary of the best recipe she knows and a neighbor dying.


Now, if I'd been on my game and a genuinely good host, you'd have gotten an Incarnation of the Pizza God on Earth -of which, I was told at many a pizza party in college, the thick, bready, crust was the best part and I should open a pizzeria- but I'm decades out of steady practice, and I doubt a traveler on a budget has lacked a lot for pizza when he wanted...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on March 13, 2018, 11:44:12 PM
Tortellini in meat sauce. 

(http://www.anunorthodoxhalloween.com/blog/wp-content/gallery/2018-buildup/F1368BDB-D6C6-4773-AB0A-08780A0BC9EB.jpeg?i=2087442357)
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on March 14, 2018, 02:45:41 AM
Looks delicious!
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on April 05, 2018, 02:35:20 AM
Tonight was pretty good.

It was a salad of half spinach, half mixed lettuces. A little bit of shredded carrot and fresh mozzarella. Some salmon, and I topped it with some Modena balsamic vinegar, which is made from red wine, is brown, and tastes kinda like pickle juice, without  the salt. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on April 05, 2018, 04:35:27 AM
I’ve been on a new diet since being in the ER 2 weeks ago.  (We don’t know still other than not heart, liver, or diabetes, meaning likely gall bladder)

Fairly radical departure from my previous daily on one hand but easy so far with the exception of cold turkey soda withdrawal.  Immediate thoughts of “success” for weight seem to even out the second week.

Been adjusting things slightly since then.  Figuring out what triggers problems and what doesn't. 

I had one major incident since the original ER visit.  Not as bad as when I hit the ER but certainly enough to grab my attention.  But, I think we finally identified the major contributor:  Corn syrup. 

Some of you may recall my allergy problems in 2014, which left me scars all up my arms.  Corn silk was the cause then, but I could still eat corn fine, or so I thought.  Since identifying corn syrup and cutting as much as I reasonably can, my entire gut been better than it has in YEARS. 

As an aside.  I've also now been a month, with only one dose of any pain medication, and even that wasnt for my head.  This is some kind of record. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on April 06, 2018, 01:12:44 AM
That fits nicely with the book I'm reading, "The Plant Paradox" by Steven R. Gundry, MD.


Essentially it blames most of our health issues on leptins ( of which gluten is one) . They're proteins created by plants to fight predators. They tend to attach to cell receptors, and block or confuse information within the body. This results in a multitude of
maladies, including arthritis, autoimmune disorders,  and many diseases that aren't caused by infections or deficiencies. New world plants are worse than Old World plants on the whole because we haven't been exposed to them for as many thousands of years.

But, you can take that with a shaker full of salt. https://nutritionstudies.org/the-plant-paradox-by-steven-grundy-md-commentary/

The diet I'm following is based on his 2008 book, " Diet Evolution" which is anti-grain on the basis of- grains are what we use to fatten livestock. We shouldn't be surprised when they work on us, too.

Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: E_T on April 06, 2018, 01:21:17 AM
D@mn, Corn Syrup is practically in everything these days...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on April 06, 2018, 02:27:18 AM
That fits nicely with the book I'm reading, "The Plant Paradox" by Steven R. Gundry, MD.


Essentially it blames most of our health issues on leptins ( of which gluten is one) . They're proteins created by plants to fight predators. They tend to attach to cell receptors, and block or confuse information within the body. This results in a multitude of
maladies, including arthritis, autoimmune disorders,  and many diseases that aren't caused by infections or deficiencies. New world plants are worse than Old World plants on the whole because we haven't been exposed to them for as many thousands of years.

But, you can take that with a shaker full of salt. https://nutritionstudies.org/the-plant-paradox-by-steven-grundy-md-commentary/

The diet I'm following is based on his 2008 book, " Diet Evolution" which is anti-grain on the basis of- grains are what we use to fatten livestock. We shouldn't be surprised when they work on us, too.


That theory fuses nicely with the anti GMO crowd since thats one of the things they target is increasing a plant's production of said proteins.  Corn one of the worst offenders. 

D@mn, Corn Syrup is practically in everything these days...

Yep. 

But, it's fairly simple on me since we I do most our own cooking at dinner.  I've come up with easy solutions for breakfast and lunch (which I don't eat much of anyway).  It's really the lack of drink alternatives that is hard on me.  I was a really bad soda junkie.  Could take or leave the caffeine, but the sugar/corn syrup is HARD to give up.  Ironically managing with some V8s when a craving is killing me.  Or a lemonade sweetened with honey when I absolutely need the sweet, but 90% just drinking plain water, which is about inverse of what I was doing before.   

Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: E_T on April 06, 2018, 03:27:30 AM
Ice Tea that you sweeten with Sugar (to your taste).  I mix mine with Coca-cola, but you could find something else to mix it with.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on April 06, 2018, 04:46:18 AM
Iced tea has turned my stomach since my first 'real' job at burger king.  God, HATED cleaning that machine every night. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on April 06, 2018, 06:12:23 AM
I'm trying to increase my water consumption, because I'm basically pissing away the pounds. I'm supposed to avoid things that even taste sweet. Not as bad as it sounds because I rarely sweeten my tea. Maybe honey when I have a sore throat.

I started using unsweetened True Lime in my water today, and that helps.

Have you tried Stevia sweetner or True Citrus flavorings?
https://www.truelemonstore.com/True-Citrus-Beverage-Sampler-p/81-1076.htm?gclid=EAIaIQobChMI6tqtn--k2gIVRLbACh2O5wwJEAQYAiABEgL_t_D_BwE (https://www.truelemonstore.com/True-Citrus-Beverage-Sampler-p/81-1076.htm?gclid=EAIaIQobChMI6tqtn--k2gIVRLbACh2O5wwJEAQYAiABEgL_t_D_BwE)
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on April 06, 2018, 03:49:59 PM
I'm trying to increase my water consumption, because I'm basically pissing away the pounds. I'm supposed to avoid things that even taste sweet. Not as bad as it sounds because I rarely sweeten my tea. Maybe honey when I have a sore throat.

I started using unsweetened True Lime in my water today, and that helps.

Have you tried Stevia sweetner or True Citrus flavorings?
https://www.truelemonstore.com/True-Citrus-Beverage-Sampler-p/81-1076.htm?gclid=EAIaIQobChMI6tqtn--k2gIVRLbACh2O5wwJEAQYAiABEgL_t_D_BwE (https://www.truelemonstore.com/True-Citrus-Beverage-Sampler-p/81-1076.htm?gclid=EAIaIQobChMI6tqtn--k2gIVRLbACh2O5wwJEAQYAiABEgL_t_D_BwE)

Haven’t dared. It’s in the ragweed family which could be a death sentence for me. (Literally)

Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on April 06, 2018, 04:03:15 PM
...You'd definitely do a bunch of interesting art off being dead, but I cannot recommend that...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on April 11, 2018, 07:35:07 PM
I really thought that I enjoyed the taste of basil, so I bought an assortment of olive oils, one of which had basil in it.

I was wrong. I don't think basil makes everything  better. It strictly belongs in the garlic/tomato/Italian food sphere.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on April 11, 2018, 08:37:08 PM
It is use sparingly/carefully in my book, it makes chicken boiling -something faintly nasty-smelling about that- smell good - but Momma finds it bitter and all basil vanished one day and has never returned...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Syn on April 11, 2018, 09:15:55 PM
When any boiling is to be done, I add basil to the water. I rarely use it on actual food.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on April 11, 2018, 09:36:31 PM
I think my BBQ sauce recipe misses a little something without basil...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: E_T on April 12, 2018, 12:40:32 AM
Get some and hide it...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on April 12, 2018, 01:55:00 AM
That would involve leaving the house.  Maybe I will.  I'll never find it at the convenience store, though.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on April 12, 2018, 03:37:51 AM
I think my BBQ sauce recipe misses a little something without basil...

But does said sauce contain garlic or tomato paste or Italian seasoning?
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on April 12, 2018, 09:24:50 AM
It's atop page two...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on April 12, 2018, 07:02:58 PM
It's atop page two...

I knew I read it once upon a time! So the answer is yes.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on April 12, 2018, 07:10:00 PM
Both, yes.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on April 12, 2018, 09:36:11 PM
Laziest of meals in my repertoire tonight:  Baked potato bar. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: E_T on April 12, 2018, 09:54:38 PM
Laziest of meals in my repertoire tonight:  Baked potato bar.

Do you have the recipe in this thread somewhere?
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on April 12, 2018, 09:59:51 PM
Uh.  Bake the potatoes and put what you want on them. 

Ham, cheese and mini peperoni are the kids' go to. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: E_T on April 12, 2018, 10:05:50 PM
Ah, thought might be more involved...

Do you know were to get some good baking stakes and what temp/time to you bake yours for?
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on April 12, 2018, 10:11:00 PM
stakes? 

Potatoes, I scrub, poke holes, wrap in foil and bake at 350.  Time depends on size, but about an hour and a half.  One trick is to put a pan of water in with it to keep them from drying out. 

I wouldn't bake steaks.  If you want a good steak to accompany, Au poivre is a decent method for stove topping a steak and easier than it sounds. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: E_T on April 12, 2018, 11:43:05 PM
My mom used to have a set of Aluminum (call them baking nails if you want) that would be inserted length wise into the potato.  She (and myself when I made them) would wash the spud, cover in foil, inset nail and put into oven.  Can't remember time or temp.

The Aluminum of the baking nails would transfer heat into the spud and allow the inside of the spud to be fully cooked (for your larger baking potatoes).  Less cooking time for one thing... Skin still moist, too...

I would have one for myself with lots of butter (not margarine).  The skin was the best, after finishing the inside.  Have later used some cheese and bacon as well as a bit of Sour Cream, but it's almost always been lots of Butter to start with...  And I take lots of time getting it ready for that butter, too...

IIRC, when Rusty and his wife had me for dinner (at a restaurant in the Pointe Orlando Complex on International Drive), when he was in Orlando, I had Steak and Baked Potato.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on April 13, 2018, 12:47:59 AM
Never heard of that.  I'll have to look into it. 

You might want to look into the microwave bags though.  (google microwave baked potato bag for a slew of options)  We got one randomly for christmas a while back and can vouch for it making a good baked potato or two.  Not so good for doing family dinner.  Put in bag and cook for ~4 minutes in the microwave. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on April 13, 2018, 01:54:28 AM
Mom does it -makes the bags, too- and it works, for sure.  Presumably, the layers of cloth defocus the microwaves to achieve better over-all penetration w/ no burns/dryspots next to raw.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on April 13, 2018, 03:52:25 AM
My mom used to have a set of Aluminum (call them baking nails if you want) that would be inserted length wise into the potato.  She (and myself when I made them) would wash the spud, cover in foil, inset nail and put into oven.  Can't remember time or temp.

The Aluminum of the baking nails would transfer heat into the spud and allow the inside of the spud to be fully cooked (for your larger baking potatoes).  Less cooking time for one thing... Skin still moist, too...

I would have one for myself with lots of butter (not margarine).  The skin was the best, after finishing the inside.  Have later used some cheese and bacon as well as a bit of Sour Cream, but it's almost always been lots of Butter to start with...  And I take lots of time getting it ready for that butter, too...

IIRC, when Rusty and his wife had me for dinner (at a restaurant in the Pointe Orlando Complex on International Drive), when he was in Orlando, I had Steak and Baked Potato.

That makes sense to me.
https://www.walmart.com/ip/File-Grip-Gutter-Spikes/38753356?wmlspartner=wmtlabs&adid=22222222222000000000&wmlspartner=wmtlabs&wl0=e&wl1=o&wl2=c&wl3=10352200394&wl4=pla-1103028060075&wl12=38753356_10000005350&wl14=aluminum%20gutter%20spikes&veh=sem&msclkid=e619eb41a8bf18a54603b191b172e1b7#read-more (https://www.walmart.com/ip/File-Grip-Gutter-Spikes/38753356?wmlspartner=wmtlabs&adid=22222222222000000000&wmlspartner=wmtlabs&wl0=e&wl1=o&wl2=c&wl3=10352200394&wl4=pla-1103028060075&wl12=38753356_10000005350&wl14=aluminum%20gutter%20spikes&veh=sem&msclkid=e619eb41a8bf18a54603b191b172e1b7#read-more)

I can't remember what you ate, except that you enjoyed the asparagus. I don't know what we ate at all that particular visit.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on April 15, 2018, 02:53:39 AM
Still on diet food. Tonight I made a tasty salmon salad. Much like a tuna salad. In this case it was salmon, eggs, pickles, avocado, and avocado mayo. Served in Iceberg lettuce wraps. EDIT - romaine, not iceberg.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on April 25, 2018, 07:10:36 PM
2 months-ish of systematically removing all traces of corn from the diet, aggressive portion control and trying the many small snacks as opposed to large meals approach to eating and I’m down a size of pants, and they are loose.  No real numbers. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on April 25, 2018, 08:03:47 PM
Pants is really the best progress measure, I always thought.  Hits the right balance between the measurable -actual weight, which can be a misleading and unhappy detail to dwell on- and the unmeasurable how-do-yo-look-now...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: E_T on April 25, 2018, 10:20:49 PM
Congrats
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on April 26, 2018, 06:30:58 AM
2 months-ish of systematically removing all traces of corn from the diet, aggressive portion control and trying the many small snacks as opposed to large meals approach to eating and I’m down a size of pants, and they are loose.  No real numbers.

Good for you!
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on May 21, 2018, 04:44:27 AM
After dinner ( pork parmesan and corn )  , while the kitchen was still dirty and I had stuff in the refrigerator that needed to be used soon, I decided to make a soup in the Instapot, a computerized pressure cooker with sensors. (Elok spoke of this appliance early in the thread).

Zuppa Toscana, and Olive Garden favorite. https://www.thechunkychef.com/slow-cooker-zuppa-toscana/?utm_content=buffer7f4e7&utm_medium=social&utm_source=pinterest.com&utm_campaign=buffer (https://www.thechunkychef.com/slow-cooker-zuppa-toscana/?utm_content=buffer7f4e7&utm_medium=social&utm_source=pinterest.com&utm_campaign=buffer)  I did the cabbage sausage chicken broth on the pressurized soup setting for the standard half hour. Depressurized, added some almond milk mixed with almond flour and the kale, let it on standby temp for half an hour. The kale texture was perfect.

Being on a diet, potatoes are on my "no" list. So I substituted diced cauliflower stems and stalk. Instead of milk or cream and flour, I substituted almond milk and almond flower.  From a texture standpoint it was like Zuppa Toscana with overcooked potatoes. Maybe I'll shorten the pressure time when I do it again. As for flavor it did have an almond milk aftertaste, but without the oiliness. So it was really pretty great diet food, and good as a soup, too.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on May 21, 2018, 05:13:41 AM
I think you hit just about everything I hate there.  That's an accomplishment in itself. 

Nothing BAD mind you, just a lot of mental blocks I have:

Soup in general.  I can't stand what most people call soup.   I think this stems from childhood and soup being one of the go-to we're out of money, water it down some more meals. 

I see (broth based) soup, and I just can't help to going back to 'this isn't going to fill me up, it's another hungry night' thinking, thus I hate it. 

Doubly for the cabbage, same reason.

This is really weird as I love more chowder or Chili styled soups, or even a good (read I made it) tomato soup. 

Then, I tried the almond milk. Just couldn't get there.  Though, admittedly, I was trying it over cereal rather than as a cooking ingredient. 

Edit:  Off the allergy meds that were causing me problems, took one homemade stomach remedy and my gall bladder symptoms aggravated by the meds cleared up immediately.  So, Uno's stomach problem remedy:     

1 tsp soy sauce (check which culture they are using and avoid things you're allergic to)
Dilute with just enough with water you can get it down.   
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on May 22, 2018, 03:29:29 AM
Sometimes it's fun to see a menu item that combines a food I hate, a food I can't stomach, and a food I'm allergic to. D.O.A.

For me soup, including Campbell's  is a comfort food. It's always been a great way to warm myself up ( it's been 50's and raining here ) and open my sinuses. I understand it's a poverty go-to food, but I usually think of it as an appetizer or side dish. I agree, the hearty chowders are best.

I bought the almond milk as an alternative unsweetened beverage, but after drinking the first glass, I couldn't bring myself to open the carton again. I eventually threw it out. Since I bought a box of six at COSTCO, I was looking for a way to use the rest of it. Making soups from scratch creamier works for me.  If that didn't work, I was going to drop them off at the food bank.

I'm glad you are finding a way to balance your allergies and meds. It sucks when the stuff that's supposed to make you better makes you worse, but in a different way!
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on May 29, 2018, 02:07:19 AM
We had people over for grilled burgers. Since bread is on my "NO" list, I substituted full size portabella mushroom caps as a hamburger roll for myself. Extra moisture to drip out the back depending upon how you hold it, but no more than adding a slice of tomato or lettuce.

I could get used to this as an alternative to lettuce wraps and sandwich rolls.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on May 30, 2018, 05:30:53 AM
We did our annual tradition over the holiday and went out to SLC for a little party.  This brought on another bout of the gallbladder issues (which hadn't fully cleared from the last one). 

On return, I had decided to try some Kombucha, but the label of every one in the store listed Kiwi Juice as an ingredient, which meant certain death to me.  I settled on a different fermented probiotic drink that is cabbage, beet, and ginger based.  Mostly because Ginger has helped me in the past to a degree.  My lord, this stuff is working better than the soy, and likely better for me as well. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: E_T on May 30, 2018, 07:22:42 PM
good to hear
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on June 01, 2018, 06:46:28 AM
Tomorrow I am going to attempt to re-create a meal from our favorite restaurant, Jiko, in Orlando. Filet Mignon with 4 cheese pasta and a red wine reduction. It may sound a little odd at first, until you realize that wine and cheese pairs well. It's a favorite of my wife's and her family. You can no longer order it, but the recipe is online. I'll report back.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on June 01, 2018, 02:37:06 PM
The wine reduction on the steak or pasta?

I imagine filet with red wine done au poivre would be great/easy
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on June 01, 2018, 05:02:52 PM
On both. It should be thicker, like a sauce, and it does have 6 peppercorns in it. The woman who blogged the recipe never tried the tuff in the restaurant, either because she's not much of a drinker, or she doesn't do 50 dollar dinners. So her approach isn't quite right.

It would be done with South African wines, because that's all Jiko serves ( the yeast there is different. The wines tend to be dry, fruity and complex. Bordeaux-like) .  Jiko made me a South African wine convert, so I have some in the cellar. I imagine it was open bottles rather than a specific wine or region. But if you're looking to substitute, think red blend. It was originally described as a "36 hour red wine reduction." So the alcohol was cooked off. It was the signature dish, but as the head chefs changed over the years they cut some corners. It was presented like an au poivre sauce,  with the steak and the macaroni on the plate, and the sauce poured over each. My wife normally asked for some sauce on the side.

Here's the link - http://www.thedisneychef.com/2013/02/mac-and-cheese-with-red-wine-sauce.html (http://www.thedisneychef.com/2013/02/mac-and-cheese-with-red-wine-sauce.html)

I'm doing the reduction in my instapot.

Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on June 02, 2018, 03:40:55 AM
Short Answer- Needs more testing.

The instructions say to reduce the wine to less than half. Well, I reduced it to less than an eighth. Flavors were wonderful, but it still was on the runny side for a sauce. I might have reduced it some more, but I didn't want to be stuck with nothing for dinner when this was highly anticipated. I had visions of the Curries reducing pitch blend to a stain and thinking they'd failed. But I did remove the alcohol, unlike the Disney Chef blogger. As I said, this reduction shouldn't contain alcohol.

I am further convinced that this was done on a larger scale at Jiko. After some post-meal internet research, I've concluded that I want to try adding some fruit pectin to the wine reduction. I don't know that this what they did, but I think it would fit. A wine reduction is the concentration of fruit flavor, why not use the essence of fruit to thicken it?

It was kinda the same with the cheese sauce. The Fontina, Asiago, Provolone, Gruyere blend was delicious! We used only half of the milk, and it was still runny. Next time I'll use less milk. If it's still too runny, I'll add cornstarch.

I substituted Fusilli from Italy purchased at Trader Joe's. I figure the purpose of pastsa is to hold sauce, and I think Fusillari and Rotini do that best. I followed the package directions, and it was excellent. ( yes, pasta is not on my diet.) I had to taste it before we invite anybody over  to eat it.

I did a lot of prepping/measuring, but I still needed my wife to stir the roux and make the cheese sauce. I had my hands full with the pasta, steaks, and wine reduction. The wind made grilling a challenge.

So the flavors were excellent, my dog cleaned the plate I put on the floor, then jumped onto my lap to try to lick my knife and fork. That's a first. My plan is try it again. If I get it right, we will likely invite the nieces over for dinner, and do a Jiko-style dessert from the same period- Pistachio creme brulet with some Nutella on the bottom. Maybe I'll go all out and do a chicken flatbread with apple slaw topping and a coffee barbecue sauce as an appetizer.

[Edit for spelling ]



Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on June 03, 2018, 01:21:29 AM
Yeah, I've never done a reduction of more than about a cup of wine, and just in a sautee pan, so I don't know what's up with the method you're running.  I imagine you're cooking it at a heck of a lot lower temp than I do.  I'd think corn starch would work just about as well as pectin for thickening, but would be hesitant/sparing with either. 

The cheese sauce, I've had better luck with flour than corn starch, myself.  But I don't want sweet in my cheese sauces.  And adding more cheese is always an option to thicken a cheese sauce. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on June 03, 2018, 03:42:29 AM
 
The cheese sauce, I've had better luck with flour than corn starch, myself.  But I don't want sweet in my cheese sauces.  And adding more cheese is always an option to thicken a cheese sauce.

I don't know why that didn't occur to me- yes I do . Multi-tasking! I blame my statin meds, because if I don't focus on remembering what I'm doing while I multi-task, I'll forget one of the tasks.  Next time I'll just grate some extra cheese to add in case.

Thanks, Uno!
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on June 06, 2018, 02:02:09 AM
So, last weekend, hEt was running a Ragnar race (google it if you don't know what it is). 

Anyway, the plan going in was our house would be something of home base for her team to crash, which meant me cooking for a small army. 

As the date approached and times got finalized, it was clear I was going to be working, so I needed something Alec could do. 

I settled on my Chicken Tikka Masala as I've been cooking it in massive batches for a while and usually freezing 2/3 -1/2 depending on the batch to have quick and easy meals later.  Well, I did the prep portion entirely different this time and believe I have a better way to freeze it in the future. 

There's really not much of a recipe these days as I've made it simpler over time: 

dice and fry the chicken with just a touch of seasoning (pick a curry blend).  Your goal is to get a nice searing on the chicken.  Set aside.

Sauce:  sautee some onions and garlic in a little butter and olive oil.  Add either fresh tomatoes (in season) or tomato sauce, and season to taste (Garam masala, salt, and cumin), simmer down to a thick, almost paste consistency then add the milk/cream/coconut/whatever to desired taste/smoothness.  Add chicken back in and heat. 

Now, normally, I just split this recipe and freeze the leftovers. 

For Alec, I left the chicken separate, and only got to the season to taste on the sauce.  I let him handle the simmer down and adding the cream.  meanwhile, he reheated the chicken in a 350 oven and added it in at the end.  (he also managed his siblings to work the side and bread dishes, I just let everyone (ie his older brother) know he was in charge of the kitchen)

It all come out fantastic, even if I didn't get any till the next day due to work. 

Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: E_T on June 06, 2018, 02:56:49 AM
Cheers to Alec!!
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on July 06, 2018, 11:49:37 PM
So while I was fishing I got this idea to make cole slaw more colorful for special events. Use red cabbage, rainbow carrots ( white, yellow, orange, and purple ), add some red radishes and a turnip for some light purple. I tried it yesterday. Shredded all of that stuff. Threw in a daikon because it was aging in the refrigerator, and a parsnip for that peppery taste. Most of it went in the freezer.

Some of it I mixed with avocado mayo ( because it's on my diet list ) and grated in some ginger. Haven't tasted the parsnip in the slaw. Once the mayo was added it became sort of a pinkish-purple and dark purple slaw, rather than a multicolor. I wonder if a vinegar base would show the colors better? It tasted okay.

Maybe next time I'll use horse radish rather than ginger.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on July 07, 2018, 02:53:39 AM
Mixed grill tonight. I tested out a few things, the first two of which I read about on the internet. Normally, when I'm done grilling I close the vents to smother the fire and preserve most of the remaining charcoal, then take the food in to serve. So, I usually don't clean the grill until the next day at best. At the worst, I do it before I light the fire the next time.

1) I read that you can clean the grill by rubbing half an onion on it. I tried that after the usual scraping and brushing. It worked pretty well. Then I put it atop the charcoal, skin side down before I lit it. ( I used to start the charcoal with a chimney, but since I switched from briquettes to "lump charcoal" I use a Firestarter stick in the charcoal heap instead. I try to avoid lighter fluid ).

Smelled good, and was completely consumed by the time I finished. I think the onion evaporates juice, then the skin dries and combusts from the outside-in, layer by layer.


2) Also, the same source suggested coating the grill by rubbing it with half a potato. I tried that, too. Even though my fire was too hot when I started, the first flip was stick-free. That was true for a burger, two brats, a lean beef steak, three marinated chicken breasts, and the cabbage steak. There was a salmon filet, too, but it was in a basket and on the periphery. There was some sticking on some of the things I flipped again, but the first is always the worst in my previous experience.


So, I'll be trying the onion and potato again. I've always found oil or whatever to be a fire hazard for this purpose.

3)Oh, yeah, the cabbage steak. I took a vertical center cut of the red cabbage I bought for cole slaw, about 1 and 1/4 inches thick. I put it in a ziplock until time to grill. I used Montreal Steak seasoning on both sides. It's salt, black pepper, red pepper, paprika, garlic and onion, dried, ground, and blended together. I usually like a little citrus peel with it, too. Anyway, I was delighted with it. I'll be doing it again.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Elok on July 08, 2018, 07:52:47 PM
I tried to do char siu (aka red-cooked) pork the other day.  It didn't work very well, I suspect because the glaze wasn't thick enough.  Anybody ever try it?
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on July 09, 2018, 07:37:32 PM
I've been meaning to get around to red cooking, but it's something the rest of the family is wholly unfamiliar with, so I've been hesitant to do it for the family. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: E_T on July 09, 2018, 11:33:37 PM
Make a small enough of a batch as well as your regular meal and let them try it out.  That way, they still have the regular meal to eat but they can sample and let you know if it would be worth it or not to do a full meal in the future.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on July 10, 2018, 01:45:07 AM
Dinner is a royal cluster as it is right now. 

3-4 nights out of the week, hEt is working nights, and Kyle is working nights 5 days a week.  So, the 3-4 nights I'm already cooking a "family" dinner, I'm also cooking reheatable meals for those two.  Sometimes that's just leftovers, sometimes it's entire second meals.  Then Alec had his wisdom teeth out, so a week of mushy food ready for him to heat...

Once winter rolls around and I don't have so much going on outside, I'll get to it. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on July 10, 2018, 01:47:47 AM
Made some pretty good chinese chicken tonight for myself, though.  Just ginger, soy, brown sugar and a touch of beet juice. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on July 24, 2018, 04:38:29 AM
I tried to post about this a few days before, but it didn't go through. Bought an air fryer on Prime Day. Well, maybe it's an appliance that disqualifies itself from the thread. It was a Phillips, the original inventor, normally $175, but it was $99 and free shipping, so I bit. I figured to make eggplant in it first, however, when I picked up the eggplant from my refrigerator drawer, the bottom was rotten. Plan B: I made chips from a Japanese sweet potato ( obscure ingredient , another DQ ) and seasoned them with various spices, batch by batch. The winner was Trader Joe's South African Smoke seasoning ( obscure ingredient, another DQ ) It's a blend of smoked African-grown paprika, sea salt, garlic and basil. It's my first successful substitution of a healthy ingredient that my wife actually liked. So, we can actually eat some of the same food. I liked it, too.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on July 25, 2018, 02:53:18 AM
Managed to spend a week on vacation eating out with no major gall bladder issues cropping up.  (2 meals made, one eaten out each day)

That's some small victory in and of itself. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on August 01, 2018, 06:36:44 AM
On the diet food front, I got some more Japanese sweet potatoes. Made chips again, this time using the slicer blade on the Kitchen-Aid. Even so, probably best consumed when made, rather than the next day. It doesn't hold it's crispiness as well as store chips. Not a problem, it's easy to eat.


Tonight I made a mash with them for a shepherd's pie. It worked pretty well as a substitute, although the natural sweetness was more apparent. Slightly weird. Next time I make a pie I'll try adding some Romano or Parmesan to see if that helps. Also I intend to make mash again & try adding some cauliflower and see if it reduces the sweetness. These potatoes are red on the outside and white on the inside. They are shaped like sweet potatoes. If anything, a little drier and harder to slice than a Russet.

Made Eggplant fries recently too, another hit. Although the wife informs me that she wants them peeled next time. Also I've learned how to pop milo in the air popper without burning it. I think I actually prefer it to popcorn.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Spacy on August 07, 2018, 02:06:35 PM
Tried to do a cassoulet last night.

Subbed in one thing, then another, then a few more, until finally - I reinvented what basically was Red Beans and Rice. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: E_T on August 07, 2018, 02:54:38 PM
just a different way of doing it...  how did it turn out?
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on August 07, 2018, 06:36:34 PM
Last week was a week of experiments all the way round. 

First, new way of making Tikka Masala.  I keep trying to simplify this down, but was testing an idea where I just can the tomato sauce and have premade jars ready to go.  Test recipe for the canning worked quite well, and will cut this down to a 30 minute easy meal.  Not really easy, since it takes hours to boil down the tomatoes to the near-paste for the recipe, but it makes easy later. 

Then it was home made ramen. 

Caveat: I've never so much as eaten an instant ramen, or any variety thereof, and wasn't following much of a recipe.  Just a general idea of what was in it and what sounded good to me.  Something in the realm of a Shōyu ramen is what I ended up making.  Unable to find ramen noodles that were not in an instant variety, I used rice noodles instead as well, able to find a variety that didn't add corn starch. 

Ended up being very good, with pork, beans and egg on top. 

Finally, in the list of Uno had never tried before was a meatloaf.  I normally dislike red meat, but had been craving meatloaf for a little while.  (not that I particularly LIKE either my mom's or hEt's) So, I modified my meatball recipe to something more savory and did a loaf.  Something of a 'proper Sunday dinner', which is not the kind of thing I normally cook.  Come out wonderfully. 



Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: E_T on August 07, 2018, 09:19:18 PM
And the recipe (for the meatloaf) is??
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on August 07, 2018, 09:30:56 PM
Uh... 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on August 07, 2018, 09:41:43 PM
Lessee..

I started with this, what I use for meatballs, only I use their spicy sausage:

http://www.johnsonville.com/recipe/italian-meatballs.html (http://www.johnsonville.com/recipe/italian-meatballs.html)

So, for the meatloaf, it was:

2 lbs ground beef  (85/15)
1 lb garlic sausage (though any kind would work I was wanting to try the new garlic flavor)
3 eggs
1 1/4 cup breadcrumbs (I use a locally procured italian seasoned breadcrumb)
3/4 cup parmesean cheese
1 cup catsup
~2 T Savory
~1 T Marjoram
~2 T Dijon mustard
Finely chopped onion (one small yellow)
4 cloves garlic
~2 T Hickory Smoke Salt. 

I'm notorious for not taking measurements on my spices, but anything with a ~ should be close, and at least gives you a reference. 

350 oven 1.5 hours, though I had made it the night before and put in the fridge overnight, so going from room temp might only take an hour. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on August 08, 2018, 03:13:35 AM
That meatloaf sounds great.
But I must admit that pretty much any meatloaf appeals to me. I guess it's my comfort food. My wife doesn't like it, so it's not something I'd make at home. I will order it when I see it on the menu.


We had eggplant fries last night, and my wife liked it better without the skin. Now she wants to know if I can put a coating on them. I said I'd try Panko crumbs or something next time.

Typical niece dining night. First there's plus 3, then +another , then two cancellations after I've already prepped. I'd be shocked if the ones that showed up where the same and only ones that said they were coming on any given night. So, I was originally planning to grill boneless pork chops and serve with a Japanese sweet potato/cauliflower mash combination. Then I decided to go mixed grill ( chicken, salmon, cauliflower ) and add a couple steaks. With that I made 4 cheese pasta and wine reduction again. This time I simply used less milk to begin with, and a third more cheese. ( 2 cups rather than a cup and 1/2 ) Well, grating a half cup of each was simpler anyway. I used a little bit of fruit pectin to thicken the wine reduction, sprinkling the dust across the top of the reduction and incorporating it just before dinner time. It worked well. By some miracle I had everything cooked perfectly and ready to plate at the designated hour. One exception. The two steaks. They were rare and medium rare, and I was aiming for medium well and well done, according to the guest preferences. I don't think I got them completely thawed. Oh well. This is why God invented microwaves. Well that and melting chocolate with 15 second pulses instead of goofing with a double boiler.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on August 08, 2018, 04:07:56 AM
In other news I processed sweet corn for freezing, always looking for ways to improve things since I do it all myself, without help.  This year I tried this tool. http://www.chefsresource.com/kuhn-rikon-corn-zipper-cob-handle.html?cmp=bingshopping&kw=kuhn-rikon-corn-zipper-cob-handle&utm_source=msn&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=(roi)+shopping+-+brand&utm_content=kuhn+rikon&utm_term=&utm_device=c&msclkid=6a53c12d2d991fc3d1659a47702ba80c (http://www.chefsresource.com/kuhn-rikon-corn-zipper-cob-handle.html?cmp=bingshopping&kw=kuhn-rikon-corn-zipper-cob-handle&utm_source=msn&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=(roi)+shopping+-+brand&utm_content=kuhn+rikon&utm_term=&utm_device=c&msclkid=6a53c12d2d991fc3d1659a47702ba80c)

I thought it did a nice consistent  job and saved time.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Spacy on August 08, 2018, 08:08:51 PM
The rice/bean/sausage dish worked out well enough.  Ate leftovers for the past couple of meals and still have enough for 1 more meal - and I hate leftovers.

Was looking at a meatloaf for the next day or two.  Local butcher had a deal on veal, so have equal parts (1/2 lbs each) ground pork shoulder, veal (stew cuts) ground and very lean ground beef.  I hate onions, though, so not sure how I am going to spice this up.  May have to add some fat in the mix for flavor, as well, as the only fat is from the pork.  Could just add some bacon.... not sure. 

Tonight is Peanut Butter, Honey & Banana pancakes, side of bacon.  Been years since I made this, gotta remember the recipe.  Not my normal pancakes (which are thin like creps) but bisquick thick - and I ain't got no bisquick, so making from scratch.  Cannot be too hard, though. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on August 08, 2018, 09:03:53 PM
I don't stomach fresh onions and peppers very well. So, for seasoning's sake I would normally use dried onions or smoked paprika instead. Or perhaps a dried potato chip dip or dried onion soup mix.


Things are usually better with bacon.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on October 16, 2018, 02:50:39 AM
Tonight I made a classic BLT for my wife, and a Caprese salad with Modena for myself. 

YEAH, I know. Modena on it isn't authentic, but it's tasty. So was the Canadian bacon I had with it. I figured the fresh mozzarella slices are round, the tomato slices are round, so why not? BLT-esque.  I really enjoyed it. I must remember to do that more often.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Elok on October 16, 2018, 07:58:08 PM
I like how I inadvertently spawned an immortal thread here.  Not cooking much ATM, since Michael knocked out most of the grocery stores.  At least we have power, and enough ingredients hauled down from my BIL's in Alabama to avoid eating yet another "nutrition bar," or whatever they're called.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on October 23, 2018, 08:08:31 PM
I like how I inadvertently spawned an immortal thread here.  Not cooking much ATM, since Michael knocked out most of the grocery stores.  At least we have power, and enough ingredients hauled down from my BIL's in Alabama to avoid eating yet another "nutrition bar," or whatever they're called.


I'm glad you started it. Everybody eats, even if we don't cook regularly.  I hope your life has been restorded to normal now.



SHRIMP BOATS

Well, they're spring rolls, only in Romaine lettuce boats instead of deep-fried pastry. I stir-fried baby shrimp, mushrooms, purple cabbage and a shredded carrot. I added some slivered almonds, unsweetened shredded coconut, and some coconut aminos ( soy sauce alternative) at the end.


I meant to add some sesame and ginger, but was out of sesame seeds and oil, and forgot about the ginger. What I liked about it was that the I could identify many of the individual textures and flavors as I ate. Also, this looked good. Purple-orange-white-greyish-black. Sort of Halloweenish. I could see this as something brought to the table and let people self-serve. Drawbacks- 1) if the contents are too hot they wilt the romaine, 2) a lot of moisture in this food, thus- it can be as messy as it is tasty and healthy.

Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Elok on October 26, 2018, 01:33:01 AM
Mostly we're fine.  They're getting the Piggly-Wiggly open again, so we can even eat real produce soon, hopefully.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Geo on October 27, 2018, 10:03:10 AM
Two weeks after it hit you? That's a long time to get food distribution going again.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: E_T on October 28, 2018, 01:32:45 AM
Need to have power to not only the local Stores but also the Distribution Hubs (for Refrigeration/Frozen Products) as well as Being able to make sales... Logistics is the key and if the machinery of the Logistics requires Power...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Geo on October 28, 2018, 04:29:16 AM
Ah, so its power distribution that wasn't fixed two weeks after the storm.
Would be unheard of in my region.

There's been preliminary alarm about possible power cuts in my country starting next month, and already officials are going out to power providers in the neighbouring countries to assure power wouldn't be cut here due to distribution issues when power is diverted to certain regions in said countries.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Elok on October 29, 2018, 01:04:39 PM
Two thirds of the trees in the county were knocked down, many of them across roads and houses.  Power lines suffered a similar fate.  Most of the gas stations were also ripped to shreds.  Even with armies of linemen and tree removal services, it takes a long time to get things in order.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: E_T on October 29, 2018, 09:44:40 PM
Yepper, that storm broke more than a few records...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Geo on October 30, 2018, 10:41:08 AM
And yet nobody wisens up and puts power lines in a position less prone to falling trees.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on October 30, 2018, 01:22:44 PM
We have buried power lines.  Trouble is trees tipping over still can dig them up and they're harder to fix.  What they excel at is the general day to day.  A lot less random outage due to lightning or bird. 


Though there's the cursed building at work that has a cat's ghost possessing it.  Cat somehow got into the main relay box outside.  Nothing's been right since.     
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: E_T on October 30, 2018, 08:07:18 PM
Trouble is trees tipping over still can dig them up and they're harder to fix.
Especially, when they have to tunnel dig the lines, the tubes can be within a tree(s) root complex, which all gets displaced when the tree is knocked over (and not broken).

Quote
Though there's the cursed building at work that has a cat's ghost possessing it.  Cat somehow got into the main relay box outside.  Nothing's been right since.     
Revenge for leaving the box accessible to the cat to try to take a nap, likely thinks it was a trap...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Geo on October 31, 2018, 02:29:47 PM
Thought that the majority of powerlines in the US are above ground. Am I wrong here?
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on October 31, 2018, 02:48:23 PM
I'd imagine that's likely true percentage wise, just due to the cost of digging up established communities to replace overhead with underground. 

Here in Utah, most areas built up after the 70's have underground lines, while the older areas have overhead.   
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Elok on October 31, 2018, 06:41:13 PM
http://alphacentauri2.info/index.php?topic=21052.new#new (http://alphacentauri2.info/index.php?topic=21052.new#new)

So this thread can go back to cooking stuff.  I haven't been doing a lot of cooking lately, but we got (frozen) vegetables at Publix today.  My six-year-old helped make the quesadillas for breakfast this AM.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on November 01, 2018, 05:11:02 AM
I made some killer potato soup as something to have on hand this busy week with everyone on different schedules and lots of events going on. 

Mostly because I couldn't find any good versions to buy. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Geo on November 01, 2018, 02:00:50 PM
Usually I buy soup at work during lunch. Almost never at prepare it at home.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on December 16, 2018, 01:43:59 AM
Had something particularly tasty tonight. Essentially steak and fried potatoes. Here's the starter recipe-
https://therecipecritic.com/garlic-butter-herb-steak-bites/?fbclid=IwAR0-d7hSsrLXpvhYf0qwPfCMqtTp8yfk9NNNN8oXVK0izJP02fJpoV1ftVQ 


I used dry sherry to deglaze the skillet between the potatoes and meat. I'm just about out of that, but I think I'll start using white wine instead. I've got lots of it, but I don't like to drink it and it's not on the diet.

Since my wife is allergic to rosemary, I substituted Montreal steak seasoning for the herbs and spices. I cooked with avocado oil and ghee instead of olive oil and butter. I also had a couple of shallots in the skillet. It was actually half Russet potatoes and half Japanese sweet potatoes. I served mine on a bed of mustard greens with a small avocado. Mushrooms would have gone well, but the wife is allergic, so I would have needed another pan. Probably next time. She would like to keep this in the rotation.

I don't remember eating mustard greens before and knowing what they were, although I think I've seen them as garnish around the outside edges at salad bars. Beautiful looking greens with a subtle peppery taste that reminds me of a parsnip. While I'm supposed to me eating varied greens in rotation, I think I'll be eating these more often.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on December 21, 2018, 02:52:10 AM
 A product endorsement. This is the best knife I've ever used in the kitchen-
https://www.misen.co/products/misen-utility-knife (https://www.misen.co/products/misen-utility-knife)

They have been running promotions, so search for coupon codes.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on December 28, 2018, 01:29:09 AM
https://www.kraftrecipes.com/recipe/168222/cheesy-bacon-hasselback-potato-recipe?cm_mmc=Social-_-Pinterest-_-Ahalogy-_-168222&crlt.pid=camp.4hdaGNogPWBj#_a5y_p=4767742 (https://www.kraftrecipes.com/recipe/168222/cheesy-bacon-hasselback-potato-recipe?cm_mmc=Social-_-Pinterest-_-Ahalogy-_-168222&crlt.pid=camp.4hdaGNogPWBj#_a5y_p=4767742)

This was a hit. Hasselback potatoes. I used two Russets and two Japanese sweet potatoes. I used Canadian bacon rather than American, but I think crispy American prepared earlier in the week for BLTs or something would be better. Trying to crisp Canadian bacon makes it tough, nd there were concerns about dental work. While I did one Russet with American cheese, I was mostly using up odds and ends of blocks of cheese partly sliced for a party last night. I don't have salad dressing, so I used olive oil and scampi seasoning.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on December 28, 2018, 01:50:19 PM
Our Holiday breakfasts were a hit. 

Biscuits/gravy for my family christmas eve morning.  (my gravy is kind of famous in my family) (eggs, bacon, etc on the side)
Crepe bar for hEt's family Christmas morning. 

Both featured a smoked ham, my friend owns a bbq business and makes a fantastic rum smoked ham, and I do a simple rosemary marsalla sauce for it for savory crepes to those who want. 
Also a breakfast 'casserole' from hEt's mom's collection of recipes (it's essentially bacon fried rice, but baked instead of fried). 

hEt's grandmother come to Christmas breakfast.  She doesn't get out much these days, but the temptation of Uno crepes is too much to pass up. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: E_T on December 28, 2018, 03:15:28 PM
Oooooh, hEt's breakfast 'casserole' sounds wonderful... can't get ya'll to post the reciept??
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on December 28, 2018, 03:55:00 PM
"Bacon rice" 

6 cups cooked rice cold
1-2 lbs bacon
4-6 eggs, scrambled
1 bunch green onions chopped

________________________

2 Tbls bacon grease
4 Tbls soy sauce
1 Tbls worcestershire sauce
2 Tbls sugar
1 tsp Accent (msg)

Mix the latter, pour over the former in a casserole dish, mix it all up, bake at 350 for 45 minutes. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: E_T on December 29, 2018, 03:56:16 PM
Sounds yummy, I'll definitely see about getting this done sometime.

The pictures, is that from multiples of the above receipt?
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on December 29, 2018, 07:43:45 PM
Yeah triple recipe for the holiday meals.  I prep it ahead so just the baking is needed before breakfast. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on January 23, 2019, 02:57:39 AM
I tried to do an Asian lettuce cup thing tonight as an experiment. I fried some chicken breasts, then cut with a steak knife and pulled the pieces apart with two forks. Then I transferred it to a pan on med-low heat with some ginger/lime/sesame salad dressing/marinade.


I sauteed some baby shrimp, then added coconut aminos. It's a fermented coconut sap. Think sweet soy sauce.

I did some basamati rice in chicken broth in the instapot.

I grated a raw beet, which made a beautiful burgundy colored slaw, I sliced some red cabage, and grated some carrots. So there were three bowls of slaw to choose from to add to your lettuce cups, and 2 proteins. It looked beautiful. Next time I'll try for some yellow carrots or beets, too. Maybe a turnip or a parsnip.

My wife really liked the chicken and rice and said I could make it again, probably with water chestnuts, too. The lettuce cup approach was a little messy, and she'd rather just eat it with a fork, as she did for her second serving. I was thinking that the nieces like asian food, and this would probably work when they were over.

I ate all of the shrimp, put some leftover chicken and rice in the fridge, and had a salad from the remnants of the slaw and one of the lettuce heads.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on January 23, 2019, 04:16:03 AM
I had a rather great lazy week last week. 

Doesn't start out lazy: 

Chicken Cacciatore.  The local grocer had these boneless/skinless massive chicken breasts on sale buying in bulk.  So, I bought a bunch, and Monday made Chicken Cacciatore out of 9 of them in a giant roaster pan with a ton of peppers, onions, and tomatoes. 

As that takes hours to finish in the oven, I made a nice side of fettuccine alfredo.

So, all the work now done...

This gave us leftovers Tuesday. 

Wednesday I thinly sliced the rest of the breasts, separated out the veggies, and most of the broth, keeping some with the chicken.

I then used the broth as a base to make home made ramen broth (mixing with some fish sauce, soy, and wine), reheating the now sliced chicken as a topping.  We froze a bunch of the ramen broth for later. 

Thursday, hEt working, made french dips as a break from chicken.

Friday, used the sliced chicken and leftover alfredo to make a chicken alfredo bake.

Saturday I thinly sliced the veggies, mixed back in with the sliced chicken, and reheated the lot with some cilantro and lime to make Fajitas. 

So, big meal Monday ended up feeding the family for the week, with 2 meals worth of ramen broth in the freezer to boot. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on January 23, 2019, 04:56:53 AM
I had a rather great lazy week last week. 

Doesn't start out lazy: 

Chicken Cacciatore.  The local grocer had these boneless/skinless massive chicken breasts on sale buying in bulk.  So, I bought a bunch, and Monday made Chicken Cacciatore out of 9 of them in a giant roaster pan with a ton of peppers, onions, and tomatoes. 

As that takes hours to finish in the oven, I made a nice side of fettuccine alfredo.

So, all the work now done...

This gave us leftovers Tuesday. 

Wednesday I thinly sliced the rest of the breasts, separated out the veggies, and most of the broth, keeping some with the chicken.

I then used the broth as a base to make home made ramen broth (mixing with some fish sauce, soy, and wine), reheating the now sliced chicken as a topping.  We froze a bunch of the ramen broth for later. 

Thursday, hEt working, made french dips as a break from chicken.

Friday, used the sliced chicken and leftover alfredo to make a chicken alfredo bake.

Saturday I thinly sliced the veggies, mixed back in with the sliced chicken, and reheated the lot with some cilantro and lime to make Fajitas. 

So, big meal Monday ended up feeding the family for the week, with 2 meals worth of ramen broth in the freezer to boot.

Awesome. I love doing something like that. My wife rarely eats leftovers, so it's usually up to me and the dog to do it.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on January 23, 2019, 02:11:13 PM
I think it's all about how you prepare the leftovers.

I don't particularly like things reheated in the microwave for instance.  The good part about braised chicken especially (cacciatore is a braised meal for the uninitiated) is it's still very moist and workable.  So, I have a well seasoned precooked chicken to work with.  All subsequent meals were reheated either on the stove top or oven.  Mixing up the flavors through the week makes it not feel like leftovers as well. 


Anyhow, surprisingly easy Thai Red Curry beef:

Red Thai Curry paste:
1 large red bell pepper
4-5 green onions cleaned, ends removed
Juice of 1/2 a lemon
2 red chilis (adjust to taste, or use your favorite pepper sauce)
4 cloves garlic
2 T ginger (I keep a minced ginger mix on hand, not sure how much that is fresh)

Throw all that in the food processor and make a paste. 

Thinly slice sirloins, season with black pepper, and brown in some sesame oil. 
Add about equal parts soy sauce and fish sauce, just enough to coat all the steak. 
Let that simmer and thicken just a bit, then add any veggies you're wanting and the red thai paste.  Saute mixture until veggies cooked.
Add some cream (or coconut milk) to desired texture of the sauce, serve with rice. 


Caveat: 

I learned red/green thai cooking from a native.  I understand most of american restaurants have them backwards.  Red is supposed to be relatively mild and let the sweet prevail, green is supposed to be earthy and hot according to my teacher. 

It just took me years to get my family to where they were comfortable with something like this as a meal. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Elok on January 24, 2019, 01:31:34 PM
We just use the Mae Ploy pastes--their green is indeed hotter than their red.

Since you brought up bacon, I'd like to add that it goes great with mac & cheese as well; I cooked bacon bits in the saucepan before starting the roux--I'd have subbed bacon grease for butter if I had a good way to measure it, but our tablespoons are plastic--and it added a smoky note that went very well with the cheddar.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on January 24, 2019, 02:28:18 PM
We just use the Mae Ploy pastes--their green is indeed hotter than their red.

Since you brought up bacon, I'd like to add that it goes great with mac & cheese as well; I cooked bacon bits in the saucepan before starting the roux--I'd have subbed bacon grease for butter if I had a good way to measure it, but our tablespoons are plastic--and it added a smoky note that went very well with the cheddar.

Been playing with the cheeses in my mac n cheese, and 2 weeks back or so did one with white cheddar, parmesean and a super sharp provolone. 

That provolone was a fantastic addition taste wise, but difficult/time consuming to properly melt in. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Elok on January 25, 2019, 01:54:40 AM
I haven't tried provolone.  I have tried mozz, and the results were so gooey as to be borderline terrifying.  Now I add a sprinkling of shredded mozz to any white sauce I want to goop up.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on January 25, 2019, 02:28:09 AM
I'm afraid that mozzarella's main attribute as a pizza topping, commercially - it's not a bad tasting cheese, but stores definitely use it over all the alternatives for the meltiness.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Elok on January 25, 2019, 02:52:45 AM
If it's whole-milk mozz, it has other selling points.  But mostly it's the part-skim stuff you find.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on January 25, 2019, 04:21:55 AM
[shrugs]  A bit bland-tasting, compared to many cheeses...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Elok on January 25, 2019, 12:14:47 PM
We, as a society, focus too much on taste at the expense of texture.  I think this might be because we're scared of fat and fat gives things a better mouth feel.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on January 25, 2019, 01:40:11 PM
I haven't tried provolone.  I have tried mozz, and the results were so gooey as to be borderline terrifying.  Now I add a sprinkling of shredded mozz to any white sauce I want to goop up.

Yeah I was thinking mozz but stumbled on the provolone.  My local grocer's quality (as in imported or local farm, not mass market) cheese stock is rotating, so you never really know what you'll find.  The good side is I'm always able to try new things.  The bad is I can rarely find a particularly good one a second time. 

I will say that particular mixture reheated fantastically well, without the separation you usually get reheating. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on February 05, 2019, 03:16:32 PM
Anyone have any good superbowl foods? 

I took that Thai Red Curry and put it over my homemade meatballs, turned out really good. 

Also made some Chicken Satay with peanut sauce. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on February 05, 2019, 11:57:31 PM
We, as a society, focus too much on taste at the expense of texture.  I think this might be because we're scared of fat and fat gives things a better mouth feel.


I think you have a point. The irony is that the fat is also more satisfying. I won't binge on dark chocolate candy the way I can on milk chocolate based candy bars.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on May 13, 2019, 04:51:41 AM
I asked my Mom want she wanted for dinner on Mother's Day, and she chose steaks. I tried something new- sprinkling a lot of sea salt on them and letting them sit for an hour before rinsing and grilling and seasoning. It was actually pretty good. I also smoked some mushrooms on the grill and baked potatoes in the oven. I had a South American white sweet potato instead, with ghee and pumpkin pie spice. For appetizers I did 1) Keto cheesy "bread," 2) dates stuffed with Belgian Fontina and wrapped in Black Forrest ham, also served 3)carrots that I'd previously fermented/preserved as spicy sweet pickles.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on May 13, 2019, 12:39:04 PM
So who's a charcoal BBQer and who's a gas griller? 

Not sure if it was 2013 or 2015 when we bought this thing:

https://www.chargriller.com/products/duo-5050-gas-charcoal-grill (https://www.chargriller.com/products/duo-5050-gas-charcoal-grill)

I've had to order replacement parts for the gas side now, and I can forsee a new grill being needed in a few years.  Looking into the ceramic grill options.  There's a couple that can do both gas or charcoal. 

Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on May 13, 2019, 03:57:42 PM
I used to be a gas grill guy. I liked the easy ignition, the temperature control and it was easier to operate in the wind and rain, and not having to get dirty handling ashes and charcoal.

When I got married my wife bought me a Webber charcoal grill. This was non-negotiable.  There was a learning curve. I agree that it tastes better. That's the point of grilling, isn't it?

My cousin has one of those egg grills that uses pellets, and seems to get impressive results with a variety of fish, game, and store meats on facebook. Those Treager wood pellet grills look pretty impressive on infomercials and at televised competitions, but I've never tasted any of it. Those are pretty expensive.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on May 13, 2019, 06:26:12 PM
I used to be a gas grill guy. I liked the easy ignition, the temperature control and it was easier to operate in the wind and rain, and not having to get dirty handling ashes and charcoal.

When I got married my wife bought me a Webber charcoal grill. This was non-negotiable.  There was a learning curve. I agree that it tastes better. That's the point of grilling, isn't it?

My cousin has one of those egg grills that uses pellets, and seems to get impressive results with a variety of fish, game, and store meats on facebook. Those Treager wood pellet grills look pretty impressive on infomercials and at televised competitions, but I've never tasted any of it. Those are pretty expensive.

Yeah, the egg grills are exactly what I'm looking at.  They can do the pellets or the charcoal, and the one I was eyeballing even had a gas insert if you wanted, which I like having the option. 

My philosophy is if I'm just doing some burger/dogs, I use the gas.  This is usually 1-4 times a week, depending on schedules.  (Alec/Kyle grill sometimes as well if they aren't eating with the family, but dogs are usually over the fire pit now) Anything more pricey, we use the charcoal.  Exceptions for if I'm out of propane or charcoal and don't want to make a trip.  It was just really eye opening to me to be using the mini aussie grill and having to let it warm for 30 minutes or more to get the coals right, to the linked one above being ready in 10.  Made me wonder  about even more efficient charcoal grills, and the ceramics can be used for other things (pizza/breads).

My brother in law has a Traeger and is very mixed in his results.  This is almost always because he is attempting to smoke and doesn't allow enough time, so it's not cooked, so he has to crank it up to grilling temps and then burns it.  I don't blame the device. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on May 13, 2019, 08:54:50 PM
Well, as I've posted about repeatedly in this thread, I've had satisfactory results with a plain ol' gas grill - w/ some charcoal, 4-6 bricks per session, and wood, deadwood picked up in the yard, to add smoke flavor.  The wood is optional, according to how fast what's cooking needs and how fatty it is.

Mom works me pretty steady grilling, at times.  Gas is fast, convenient and cheap, compared to charcoal, and just a handful of bricks and wood in the bottom makes up for most of the difference in taste.  Charcoal takes a half hour or so getting started; my way takes maybe five minutes pre, and I'm cooking.   I recommend it, with the caveat that you have to burn the occasional effort for a while learning what kind of thing will drip enough grease to make its own smoke...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on May 14, 2019, 05:06:25 AM
Love some pics of your setup. 

Looking at similar to this:  https://www.homedepot.com/p/Vision-Grills-Kamado-Char-Gas-Dual-Fuel-Charcoal-Gas-Grill-in-Taupe-with-Grill-Cover-S-T4C1D1-H/300490497?cm_mmc=Shopping%7CG%7CBase%7CD28I%7C28-22_BBQ+GRILL%7CNA%7CPLA%7CBrands%7CFixed%7c71700000032321202%7c58700004410186037%7c92700037079252529&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIy7Wv-JGa4gIVmbjACh0ulw8tEAQYAiABEgLIPvD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds (https://www.homedepot.com/p/Vision-Grills-Kamado-Char-Gas-Dual-Fuel-Charcoal-Gas-Grill-in-Taupe-with-Grill-Cover-S-T4C1D1-H/300490497?cm_mmc=Shopping%7CG%7CBase%7CD28I%7C28-22_BBQ+GRILL%7CNA%7CPLA%7CBrands%7CFixed%7c71700000032321202%7c58700004410186037%7c92700037079252529&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIy7Wv-JGa4gIVmbjACh0ulw8tEAQYAiABEgLIPvD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds)


edit:  I should mention both my interest and my trepidation with the ceramic grills stems from my time at Burger King. 

Their broiler is a very large ceramic grill.  While I only worked there fully for 2 years, I was one of the few trained on dismantling, repair, and cleaning of their grill, and would get paid to come back and teach a course on that several times a year for a couple years after. 

The strengths: 
After a new grill is properly 'seasoned', it's capable to making some really good burgers. 
quick cooking (obvious), but the mix of searing and indirect heat is fairly unique. 

(Protip:  Order your burger ran through the broiler twice) 

Weaknesses:
Oh, freaking nightmare to clean.  Granted, BK needed to clean about every 6 months, and I don't think I could match that volume of cooking in my lifetime. 
Seasoning took a good 3 months for brand new, and another month or two after cleaning. 
Ceramic breaking.  Rare, but devastating when it happened. 
BK purposely did not season burgers as it would lower the lifespan of the grill.  Again, I doubt I'd have enough qty for that to matter much for my purposes.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on May 15, 2019, 12:23:38 AM
Love some pics of your setup.
You're in luck; Momma asked me to grill steaks, and I remembered to grab the camera...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on May 15, 2019, 12:56:07 AM
The first pic attacked is for the smoke coming out the back two or three minutes after lighting - way more smoke than gas produces, unless something very fatty has been cooking for 10 minutes or more and made a big grease fire.

The second is a failed attempt to shoot the smoke from another angle -light/moderate smoke is hard to photograph- but Rusty, notice in the top right corner, the rose bush Momma started last year.  The red in the center is a background fire hydrant on the edge of Mylochka's yard.  I don't know if the arch shape of the arrangement is clear.  I've helped a little, but mostly it's Momma's work.

Third shot is the steaks in progress.  Obviously from the color, that's wood burning you can see.  I don't think the coals contribute a lot to the heat, but I have to be careful not to use TOO much wood, depending on what I'm cooking and a lot of factors.  Many meats, especially steak, I prefer to undercook on the grill, so as not to cook it too dry, and finish off in the microwave indoors.  Gets to cook a little in its own juices, that way, and leaves some broth to drag bites through and flavor a baked potato, or sop up with bread...

I should clean the grill mesh more often, but figure it tends to sterilize, or I'm not cooking hot enough to scorch the outside of the meat in the first place - and I definitely let the ash in the bottom pile up, as it seems to contribute to the smoke that's the whole point of cooking that way...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on May 15, 2019, 01:14:36 AM
Oh, I see, yours is so shallow the gas lights the charcoal/wood for you.  I'd have quite a space to fill to get the same result.  I've been considering filling the bottom with lava rock for insulation purposes anyway, but it would allow me to try something similar.  (I happen to have a TON of lava rock left over from rebuilding the fire pit anyway.)


Did the pics bork the forum width for anyone else? 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Buster's Uncle on May 15, 2019, 01:47:30 AM
None are wider than 779 pixels.  They shouldn't be able to bork much, should they?


I should mention that that's my second gas grill since this thread commenced - the first had some mileage on it already when I got it, and I was using the water spray bottles not only to keep grease fires under control, but to put out any wood and coals let unconsumed when I finished cooking.  That latter proved a false economy -with charcoal cheap and the wood free from the yard- as a.) it encouraged any ash built up over the gas holes in the burner to cement, and b.) encouraged the inevitable rust in all the heated metal that is the eventual undoing of all grills, but quicker.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: E_T on May 16, 2019, 06:26:08 PM

Did the pics bork the forum width for anyone else?
yeah, but not too bad...
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Elok on May 25, 2019, 04:15:16 AM
My wife is the grill operator in our family; she was a total pyro as a kid, and still basically is.  She does a magnificent jerk-seasoned pork chop.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on May 25, 2019, 07:38:03 AM
My wife is the grill operator in our family; she was a total pyro as a kid, and still basically is.  She does a magnificent jerk-seasoned pork chop.

Have you bought her a brulee torch? She'd have fun with that.
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on May 26, 2019, 09:04:40 AM
Retrofitted our grill.  new top grates and burners, and tossed out the old heat shields.  Instead of putting new heat shields (I still have in case I need them), I used the brackets to install a grate right over the burners, on which I put a layer of lava rock, and have enough room now to put a few charcoal briquettes and/or wood similar to BU's setup.  The lava rock grills are a little old school, but I figure it'll give me a good feel for whether I want to pursue the ceramic grill or not. 

I figure 1-2 years with this before the whole thing succumbs to rust. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on May 27, 2019, 02:22:54 AM
Did a mixed grill today....with mixed results

The Pork chops with Montana steak seasoning and the filet mignon marinated in orange/sesame/ginger cooked to medium-well were perfection.

I tried a new marinade on 4 chicken breasts. I had a flame-out due to the olive oil in the mix. So, one breast cooked right, but "too much pepper." The other three were what I call "Cajun style" ie, blackened on the outside. I tasted some. Too dry, really, even after peeling off the black layer. My plan was to use the surplus chicken in another dish with a sauce, sort of like pulled pork, so it is still viable.

Center cut of cabbage in the center of the grill seasoned with Montana steak seasoning was also over-cooked, but I'm glad it wasn't a pricey piece of meat. As it turned out, just flake off the burnt papery portions and eat it. Still pretty good.

Some small potatoes I tried on a higher rack were undercooked according to one guest, but were easily microwaved. Asparagus  cooked beside it pleased those who like asparagus. Three Bratwursts cooked on what was the cooler side tended to be under done on one end despite flipping and turning. They are mostly for re-heating anyway. Not a problem, but still a shortcoming in that I was aiming for an even cook on the whole sausage, not 3/4ths of it. Since the steak and chops were the primary requests, the dinner was a major success. I was trying to meet the dinner time target. Next time I'll start the fire 5- 10 minutes sooner, or cut back the air slightly. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on May 28, 2019, 04:23:12 AM
So the retrofit definitely has my grill reaching higher temps. 

Did a simple test run on some burgers the day of the retrofit, and again some chicken today.  Really kind of surprised how quick it gets up to temps.  Using the heat shields, I was typically reading 400-500 degrees.  With the lava rock, I run ~600 on high.  Grease is typically vaporizing to smoke instead of causing flare ups. 

Modified my french roasted potatoes to go on the grill instead of in the oven, so pan of potatoes on the top rack, chicken beneath while the boys made alfredo inside, all for the Boss's Bday. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: E_T on May 28, 2019, 11:01:52 AM
Happy B-Day hEt
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Trench Dog on May 28, 2019, 11:18:04 AM
I have my own pasta sauce recipe that is stupid easy to do.

Any sort of meat, can be hamburger made into meatballs or steak cutlets, whatever you prefer. Cook it on the side.

Get a clove of garlic, mince it pretty finely.

Canola oil, or really any sort of cooking oil will do. Put a bit of oil, not too much, into a pot and the minced garlic. Let it fry for a bit.

Add crushed tomato, fresh or canned, don't really matter.

4 teaspoons of sugar.

4 good shakes of salt.

4 good shakes of pepper.

Slice an orange into about a third, squeeze all the juices in and just throw the whole crushed thing into the mix. Stir, and let it slow cook for a bit as you do. Add more squeezed orange juice for a citrusy flavour or a bit more garlic depending on preference.

Throw in the meat, and you got yourself a nice and easy sauce for spaghetti.


Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: E_T on May 28, 2019, 06:21:32 PM
I have my own pasta sauce recipe that is stupid easy to do.

Any sort of meat, can be hamburger made into meatballs or steak cutlets, whatever you prefer. Cook it on the side.

Get a clove of garlic, mince it pretty finely.

Canola oil, or really any sort of cooking oil will do. Put a bit of oil, not too much, into a pot and the minced garlic. Let it fry for a bit.
You should try Extra Virgin Olive Oil for this, better overall health and weight wise...

Quote
Add crushed tomato, fresh or canned, don't really matter.

4 teaspoons of sugar.

4 good shakes of salt.

4 good shakes of pepper.

Slice an orange into about a third, squeeze all the juices in and just throw the whole crushed thing into the mix. Stir, and let it slow cook for a bit as you do. Add more squeezed orange juice for a citrusy flavor or a bit more garlic depending on preference.

Throw in the meat, and you got yourself a nice and easy sauce for spaghetti.
sounds good
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Rusty Edge on June 05, 2019, 03:53:46 AM
Okay, this is a favorite of my wife- Barbeque chicken flatbread. It was an appetizer in the restaurant.
http://www.disneyinyourday.com/2017/02/13/barbecue-chicken-flatbread-recipe-from-jiko/ (http://www.disneyinyourday.com/2017/02/13/barbecue-chicken-flatbread-recipe-from-jiko/)

But it has multiple parts. Fine if you're a restaurant with a brigade system and a clay oven. Makes a mess in a home kitchen and takes time.

There's a flatbread, a pesto, a slaw, chicken, and barbecue sauce.

So for shortcuts, use a prepared flatbread or small pizza crust, or I make a Keto Cheese bread - https://www.craftymorning.com/keto-no-carb-cheesy-bread-recipe (https://www.craftymorning.com/keto-no-carb-cheesy-bread-recipe) For this I simply do 2 cups of grated hard Italian cheese, 2 cups of soft cheese ( I think it was Manchego tonight) and 2 eggs. There's enough salt in the cheese I used that I didn't add seasoning. The advantage of the cheese crust is that it is warm, and you don't need to add cheese to the crust.

Use leftover chicken, or grill extra the night before .

For barbeque sauce, just use a favorite one and add ground coffee to it.

For the pesto, I used a cilantro paste in a tube, only adding the ground cumin and ginger to it.

No shortcuts on the slaw. I found the jicama easier to peel when treating it like a shallot- start an edge and peel the skin off with your hands, only use a potato peeler to dig out the eyes. Don't do it much ahead of time, because the apple will brown.

People seem to prefer this warm, so you might want to warm your bread, chicken and sauce before assembly.

Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Trench Dog on June 05, 2019, 06:01:19 AM
My (and originally my late father's) recipe for beef stroganoff.

Tomato sauce and tomato base in a pot.

Mince onion, green pepper, saute in a pan with some oil and throw it into the sauce pot. 

Round beef steak, chop it up into strips and then small pieces. Throw it on a pan with a bit of oil, cook it and add water and beef broth for flavour as you cook the meat, and if you'd like a bit of season salt.

Put in a bit of garlic powder (or minced garlic, also sauteed if you prefer that.)

Sprinkle in pepper and a bit of salt.

Throw in the meat once it is cooked, and then let it cook for anywhere from 3-6 hours occasionally stirring to let the meat soak up the flavours.

Combine with noodles of your choice, I typically like egg noodles with this.


Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: Unorthodox on June 24, 2019, 03:46:35 AM
Alright, it's grilling season, and with the house being torn apart, I'm looking at plenty of it over the summer (winter for Dale). 

So, let me hear about your burger secrets. 

First, IMO, there's two ways people try to make a good burger.  Fixins or mixins. 

Fixin wise, the most Utah thing out there is:

Blue Bacon Burger:  Utah original (fairly well documented), though some national chains are making poor knockoffs lately.  Basic burger patty, thick bacon, swiss cheese, lettuce, tomato and Blue cheese dressing. 

Mount Ogden Burger:  The other claimed Utah original, seen it much more widely across the country, Patty, ham, swiss, lettuce, tomato, "Fry Sauce" (this is a totally Utah thing, but thousand island dressing is a common substitute) 

It's the mixins I'm more interested in. 

A little history with me:

We were dirt poor, and mom approached burgers as an economic way of feeding the family.  Anything that would extend that meat was fair game.  Thus, for most my childhood burgers were closer to meatloaf.  Always a package of lipton onion soup mix was going to be in.  Most common other items to mix into the burger were zucchini and carrots.  Oats, bread crumbs, etc were never unheard of.  Add an egg or two if they don't want to stay stuck together. 

By comparison, the prepacked patties they now use are tasteless. 

About 20 years ago, I found a pile of recipes in my grandma's trash bin.  Among these is a depression era recipe for hamburgers, and it's become the basis of my own tinkering since.  Though, I've yet to take it all the way to it's ultimate step. 

It goes thus: 

The recipe calls for getting castoffs from the butcher, with certain cuts to look for to run through your meat grinder.  Jumping it into today, you want equal parts ground sirloin and ground chuck.  This yields a fairly lean burger. 

Mix that together, and smash it all as flat as you can make it.  To this, you're going to add your spices.  Now the recipe gets lost here with pieces impossible to reproduce ('grandpa's mustard' and 'moms chili paste' are just nowhere to be found).  But the gist of it still lives. 

Make a paste out of liquid and dry spices.

Last night, I used Dijon mustard with a bit of soy sauce and Cholula hot sauce mixed with garlic salt, pepper, minced onions, and thyme. 

Anyway, spread the paste evenly across your flattened ground beef.  Roll it up into a loaf, and knead it until mixed.  Spread flat and repeat. 

Make your patties.  This is where I break from the recipe, make thick burgers and grill. 

The recipe calls for thin patties.  WHICH YOU THEN ROLL IN PEANUTS and fry.  (Peanuts at the time of the great depression were extremely economical and would have been a great way to extend your meat)  One of these days I'll work up the courage to try the peanuts, but I don't know how that'll fair on the grill, and I don't care for fried burgers much. 



So, last Sunday was both my birthday and Fathers day.  So, what I got was to invite everyone over and cook dinner.

I figure if I have to deal with a family event, it's easiest to do it on my home turf, and not having to leave the house was as good as it was getting. 

So, I made ye above recipe with a few modifications I've come up with over the 3 years since posting:

I only use the ground sirloin.  This is too lean to stick together well, so I dice up as small as possible a bit of bacon and mix into it.  About 1/4 lb bacon to 2 lbs sirloin. 

I did not use the hot sauce for my family, and have become particular with using Ingelhoffer stone ground mustard.  Which, the vituperator my brother married hates mustard, but I don't care. 

I very rarely trust people on such occasions as it's polite to say how good things are. 

Every family asked me for the recipe days later. 

Including my parents today.  And dad asking if that was some kind of traeger or smoker I was using.  (I actually had all my grilling up and running:  The charcoal side of my big grill and my travel charcoal both cooking burgers, and my gas grill doing pineapple and a few dogs for the kids.) 

Mom was surprised it was her dad's recipe.   They've gone to just using pre-packaged patties, not even the stuff I grew up on. 
Title: Re: The Lazy Gourmet
Post by: E_T on June 24, 2019, 03:57:10 AM
First off, Happy B-Day UnO

Second, sounds fantastic...  Making me hungry as I type this...